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The Enclave at Seabridge Now 85 Percent Sold

| Community | November 21, 2018

This exclusive collection of 42 brand new single-level homes is now 85 percent sold, but additional floor plans and breathtaking views still remain. Currently, only seven homes remain.

The interiors at The Enclave have been designed with gourmet kitchen appointments that include top of the line stainless steel appliances, solid surface counters, with soft close European cabinetry and drawers throughout. To view these features in person, the sales center is open six days a week (Monday by appointment only) to tour models and enjoy the marina views.

Residents of Seabridge enjoy walkable access to generous amenities that include a fitness center with pool and spa, a clubhouse for private gatherings of family and friends and community-wide full-time security.

The charming seaside community of Oxnard is located on the beautiful Southern California coast and nestled by the Pacific Ocean with an active marina that sustains a uniquely vibrant quality of life. Home to more than 20 miles of spectacular scenic coastline, residents enjoy a temperate, Mediterranean-style climate year-round, with expansive and uncrowded white sand beaches perfect for volleyball, surfing or simply effortlessly lounging with a good book. The Channel Islands Harbor is the portal to the picturesque Channel Islands National Park and the heart of boating, sport fishing, kayaking, and marine life and whale-watching excursions.

The neighborhoods also boasts an expanding cultural arts district, state-of-the-art cinemas, an outdoor shopping center, a growing retail sector and 40 plus international dining options. Famous for its strawberries, every summer the city hosts the California Strawberry Festival, featuring vendors offering a wide variety of treats with this sweet berry as the main ingredient. Nearby Downtown Ventura is culturally robust with summer concerts, art shows, live theatre, festivals and more.

Call today to schedule a viewing (805) 253-2754. Visit TheEnclaveOxnard.com for more information.

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Creativity Advocacy – Creativity and Chaos

| Community | November 16, 2018

October was quite a chaotic month for me and my family. My daughter’s wedding was in the works, so we housed over 25 guests, set up and tore down an ambitious event in wine country, cooked, cleaned, toured the Hollywood sign and visited the Walk of Fame. If my neighbors were attempting to keep track, they probably couldn’t make much sense of all of the rented vans and trucks. It appeared to be utter chaos. And it sure did feel like things were out of control. After all, it’s impossible to control much of anything when there are so many moving parts.

Truth be told, at the time, I couldn’t catch my breath.

One by one, though, our houseguests flew back across the pond, and things are finally returning to their usual state. My washing machine is on hiatus and the recycle bin is empty after hordes of bottles and cans had filled it throughout all of the festivities. October is over! Routine is slipping in little by little, silently, but not unnoticed.

Now that my heart rate is returning to normal, I am able to reflect on all of the mayhem—the many trips to LAX and Trader Joe’s, the random mismatched pillowcases and strewn coffee cups; the countless grins and smiling faces, British accents (my daughter married a Brit), the emotional hugs, sentimental toasts and flowing tears. I am beginning to see how all of the craziness came together to create an unforgettable ceremony; how all of this frenetic activity miraculously carved out an epic celebration. I couldn’t see past my own busy-ness in the midst of the planning and prepping and setting up and tearing down. But now that the champagne glasses have been boxed and put in storage, now that the beautiful photos are being shared, I am feeling the true significance of October because with November comes a different perspective.

During times of such busy-ness, I often feel like I’ve lost any sort of Creativity and that I am just a slave to the task at hand. Most of us go through these periods where we feel like we are in a circus, spinning plates in the air, and when we accept one too many plates, our only focus becomes finding a way to keep those plates from crashing. It’s tricky to take our eyes off of the plates in order to see what’s going on around us. But when we do take a step back, after it’s all over, we are met with a surprise.

Creativity.

According to F. David Peat, who was a student of the late physicist Dr. David Bohm, the only difference between order and chaos is point of view. Creativity ventures into the unknown, gathers what is there, and marries it with the known—making sense of our happenings. The example he offers is an atom. From inside the atom, the perspective looks like there’s a bunch of electrons whirling around in chaos. But from just outside of that atom, one can see a pattern around it. Beyond that, an observer can see that atoms are part of something even larger—a molecule. And molecules are part of larger matter, and so on. Creativity is the ability to gain a lofty perspective and connect all we see from that vantage point.

Chaos has a bad rap. Remember in the comic book “Batman” how the joker and the penguin always aim for mass chaos? Even Maxwell Smart in “Get Smart” from the ‘70s fought the crime ring called “Kaos.” Somehow chaos is part of the darker side of humanity—which, if we are honest, is actually counterproductive to understanding true Creativity. Only when we don’t see our connection to the whole is something rendered dark or unproductive.

I find it redemptive just knowing that if we can hold on and complete our overwhelming tasks, somehow accepting the chaos, that we can fulfill the mission of Creativity by making meaning out of it. We just need to gain perspective. I had no idea that my daughter’s wedding would be so grand until I looked past the small stuff. All of the chaos brought people together, joined two in matrimony and taught me that ultimately, Creativity is about designing our lives—fashioning togetherness. Anything that magnificent may require some scrambling.

Afternoon T

| Community | November 16, 2018

Q: All I seem to do anymore is work-work-work. I’m not sure I’m ever going to feel like I’ve “made it” in life. I have a nice enough home and car that runs and all, but I want so much more that it hurts my heart. It’s not wrong to want more, is it?

A: Wanting more and questioning your success isn’t wrong, but maybe the healthier road to take is one where you question the value of what it is you want in life. In order to truly do that, my advice would be to reverse-engineer the idea of what that means to you. Go backwards from your last imagined heartbeat and tell me what’s left in those moments? Probably not the material things you can purchase (or owe money on, if debts go unpaid). Let’s say you do manage to obtain pricey property with luxury cars in the driveway, and all the designer stuff you can wear on vacays to exotic locations – it all gets left behind at the end of one’s days. Even if you’re monetarily successful enough to have your name etched on buildings you donate funds for, or end up notable enough to have books and movies made to tell your story, it all fades eventually. It’s true, that old phrase, “You can’t take it with you!” But, I’m about to reveal a loophole! Something priceless that you can and will take with you. Now, you can’t accrue this in brick and mortar savings and loan buildings nor can you tuck it into safes hidden in the walls of fancy McMansions. In fact, it’s currency that can’t be accounted for by any government agency, even though it’s sort of a Tax Shelter for the soul. The only commodity you’re allowed to shuffle off this mortal coil with is … love. So, why not spend your lifetime collecting all you can? Not just the family love you see plastered on billboards and in ads, either – you know, the stuff of engagements, weddings and babies (which can be incredibly enriching when all is said and done) or the love of self that spa treatments, exercise studios and eat/pray/love excursions would ask you to indulge in. Start collecting love in small increments that will ultimately add up, as you give, make and take.
Clean out your closets and drawers of items you no longer wear and donate it. Someone in need of a job just might use it for an interview that could change their life and the lives of the people they love.

Pick up the discarded litter that someone missed, even though the trashcan was feet away. It’s a little gesture that shows the planet some love, which is kind of a big deal.

Find room in your heart for acceptance of others.

There are many more expressions of love, but just those three actions have tremendous value and remarkable returns. “… in the end, the love you take – is equal to the love you make.”

xo – t.

Trash and Recycling Services Delayed in Observance of Thanksgiving

| Community | November 15, 2018

Waste Management of Santa Clarita’s curbside residential trash and recycling and commercial pick-up schedule will be delayed by one day beginning on Thursday, November 22, and through the remainder of the week in observance of Thanksgiving. All local Waste Management operations will be closed on Thursday, November 22, with normal operations resuming on Friday, November 23.

Residential customers who receive service on Thursday are being asked to place their carts out for service on Friday, November 23 and those who receive service on Friday should place their carts out on Saturday, November 24. Commercial customers who receive service on Thursday will receive service on Friday.

Customer service is available at 661-259-2398.

About Waste Management
Waste Management, based in Houston, Texas, is the leading provider of comprehensive waste management services in North America. Through its subsidiaries, the company provides collection, transfer, recycling and resource recovery, and disposal services. It is also a leading developer, operator and owner of landfill gas-to-energy facilities in the United States. The company’s customers include residential, commercial, industrial, and municipal customers throughout North America. To learn more information about Waste Management visit www.wm.com or www.thinkgreen.com.

Honoring Military through Hometown Heroes Banner Program

| Community | November 15, 2018

Familiar faces are once again proudly displayed on streetlight pole banners throughout the city. The City of Santa Clarita’s Hometown Heroes Military Banner Program honors actively-serving military members from the Santa Clarita Valley with banners that are displayed three times a year on Memorial Day, the Fourth of July and Veterans Day. Banners highlighting Santa Clarita Valley’s Fallen Warriors are also posted along the Fallen Warriors Memorial Bridge on Golden Valley Road.

Los Angeles County Supervisor Kathryn Barger recently made a $5,000 donation to the program, matching a donation from the City. This allows families who can’t afford banners to be able to recognize their loved ones.

“I’m honored to join the City of Santa Clarita in this special effort to commemorate the service and sacrifice of our Hometown Heroes – the men and women in the armed forces who call this community home,” said L.A. County Supervisor Kathryn Barger.

The banners were installed at the end of last month in time for the Veterans Day ceremonies taking place this weekend. They will remain up through the New Year, allowing family and friends to see their loved one’s face every day – even if they are miles away this holiday season.

“Our military families are incredibly proud of their heroes and the important job they are doing – but that doesn’t make their absence any easier,” says Councilmember Bob Kellar. “The holiday season is especially tough for families of active-duty military. Our Hometown Hero Banners give them a chance to see their loved one every time they are out and about in Santa Clarita. They’ve told me the sense of pride that gives them is indescribable.”

Earlier this year the city launched a new Hometown Heroes website to better recognize our men and women in uniform. This website features a search function, which allows visitors to the site to view the city’s heroes by military branch and rank.

Friends and family are now able to submit a request to honor actively-serving military members from the Santa Clarita Valley with a free digital banner on the City of Santa Clarita’s Hometown Heroes Military Banner Program website. An online request form is available at santa-clarita.com/heroes.

Each street pole and digital banner features the military member’s photograph, name, rank and branch of the military they serve. The online banner will display the same information as the street pole banners do, with the added option of including a short description, and will be on display on the city’s Hometown Heroes Military Banner Program website.

As an ongoing program, orders will be accepted at any time. Each banner costs $417.50 plus tax, but thanks to generous sponsors, a special $100 discounted rate is currently available and other sponsorships are available for those in need. The price includes the installation and removal of the banners. When the Hometown Hero is no longer in the service, the family gets to keep the banner as a memento.

Consider giving the gift of a Hometown Hero banner this holiday season. For more information, contact Councilmember Bob Kellar at bkellar@santa-clarita.com or visit santa-clarita.com/heroes.

Santa Clarita Veterans Presented with Keys to Their New Homes

| Community | November 15, 2018

Homes 4 Families, in partnership with The California Department of Veterans Affairs (CalVet), will be hosting a key presentation ceremony for 24 low-income military families in need of homes on Saturday, November 17 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Speakers and presenters to include CalVet Secretary Dr. Vito Imbasciani, Congressman Steve Knight, Los Angeles County Supervisor Kathryn Barger, Santa Clarita Mayor Laurene Weste, Santa Clarita Mayor Pro Tem Marsha MacLean, Santa Clarita Councilmember Bill Miranda, California State Honor Guard, and 24 low-income veterans and military families.

The Key Presentation Ceremony celebrates the completion of Phase III, the final phase of the 78-home Cal Vet Residential Enriched Neighborhood (REN), by presenting 24 veterans and their families with keys to their new homes. There will also be a veteran art show, showcasing art by veterans and military family members who currently live in, or are about to move into the neighborhood. This event is free and open to the public.

The CalVet REN program provides low income Veterans an opportunity to buy a home. For a Veteran to buy a home in a CalVet REN community, a Veteran must accomplish three things: qualify for a CalVet Home Loan, provide sweat equity by building the home, and complete self-sufficiency courses.

The ceremony will be located at Santa Clarita CalVet REN (Residential Enriched Neighborhood) 21550 Centre Pointe Parkway, Santa Clarita, CA 91350. For more information, go to www.homes4families.org or www.calvet.ca.gov/CalVetREN.

City Creates ‘The History of Santa Clarita Coloring Book’

| Community | November 9, 2018

Even if you missed this year’s State of the City Luncheon, you can still get in on the celebration of “Santa Clarita: A City of the Arts.” For the event, a new coloring book depicting historical scenes and locations in the Santa Clarita Valley as well as City art pieces was created. “The History of Santa Clarita Coloring Book,” which was distributed in printed form to attendees at the State of the City Luncheon on October 25, is now available as a free download by visiting santa-clarita.com/coloringbook.

“Santa Clarita’s rich history was crafted by those who came before us such as William S. Hart and Tiburcio Vasquez. It was shaped by landmark events such as the discovery of gold beneath the Oak of the Golden Dream and the horrific tragedy that was the St. Francis Dam disaster,” said Mayor Laurene Weste. “This coloring book brings history to life, supports curriculum in our schools and engages students with visual representations.”

“The History of Santa Clarita Coloring Book” consists of 20 pages for coloring and two pages of activities. Locations depicted in the coloring book include Beale’s Cut, the Newhall School Auditorium and Heritage Junction. By visiting the City’s website, parents and teachers will be able to download the complete book or individual pages to print.

To see the complete book and discover all of the pages that can be downloaded, visit santa-clarita.com/coloringbook.

Veterans Program Awarded Grant Funding

| Community | November 9, 2018

College of the Canyons has been awarded $200,000 in grant funding, which will assist COC in its commitment to helping veterans, active duty members and dependents achieve their academic goals.

“The funding will be used to establish new and enhanced services for veterans and dependents of veterans,” said Renard Thomas, Director of Veterans Resource Center (VRC). “With the projected growth of the Canyon Country community, one of our priorities is to improve services and access at the Veterans Resource Office on the Canyon Country campus.”

The grant funding will help ensure the program can accommodate exponentially more students. Office hours at the Canyon Country campus will be extended to increase accessibility. The veterans certification process will be improved through the reorganization of staff and a more sophisticated communication system that will engage students at every step of enrollment, from first contact to registration. An online orientation will allow veterans outside of the area to access their education benefits while they are exiting the military or from their residence outside of the immediate area.

The grant funding was awarded to eligible colleges through a competitive process. In total, $8.5 million was awarded to 59 colleges by the California Community Colleges Board of Governors.

To learn more about the College of the Canyons’ Veteran Resource Center, visit the department’s web page.

The Benefits of Journaling

| Community | November 8, 2018

Have you thought about journaling? Do you already journal and need some new ideas?

Journaling is older than the written word. People have been tracking their lives since cavemen were drawing crude pictograms on walls. It’s in our DNA to draw, write, process and document our journey through life. Some of this country’s most beloved treasures are the journals and accounts written by the founding fathers and mothers of America.

There are three big benefits to keeping a journal. These include exploration of possibilities, expressing the processes of life, and gaining a personal historical perspective.
Explore the possibilities. Journaling creates a safe space to ponder any and every idea that comes to mind. Sometimes one of the best ways to manage the overwhelming parts of life is to empty your head of the thoughts, ideas, and information running through your mind. Writing down the information frees you up to let it go. The brain is no longer required to manage so much information.

Whether you are plotting out a new business, processing your thoughts in a safe place or creating a documentary of a journey, journaling is an effective way to sort through life and create new outcomes.

Express yourself. Just as art, music and dance are forms of expression, journaling is a fundamental way that people express themselves. Whether you are doing Bible journaling, bullet journaling or writing long hand in a leather bound book filled with empty pages, you are expressing yourself in a very profound way. No two journals are alike and there is great power in having an outlet to share whatever is on the forefront of your mind.

Remember what happened. What you are experiencing today is going to be a memory in a very short amount of time. What you feel about life, happiness, sadness, elation, or confusion won’t always be the case. You won’t always be a new resident to the Santa Clarita Valley, expecting your first child or grandchild, or be in the beginning stages of starting your business. Journaling creates a timeline where you can live in the moment and reflect back in the future. Nothing is better than going back and revisiting who you were back then and recognizing how far you’ve come and seeing that things really did work out for the best.

Being able to see how you worked through issues and made it to resolution is beneficial. One day your family may read your journal and have a new and profound understanding of who you were and what challenges you were managing at different times of life.

There are many different ways to journal. Not every journal has to be a blank paged book that you write in for hours sharing your innermost thoughts. Some journals take minutes to update. Others use no words at all. Journaling isn’t so much about how you do it as it is that you do it with frequency and consistency.

Depending on the outcome you desire from journaling, you can design a journal practice that accommodates your needs. You can keep track of a goal, work through difficult times, express yourself creatively, engage in self-care or simply catalogue your dreams. Whatever your need, there is a way to journal it. These are some traditional journal ideas:
Blank notebooks
Electronic notebooks
A writer’s notepad or notebook
Fill-in-the-blank prompting journals
Gratitude journals

Traditional journals are excellent for people who love to write and spend time laying out their ideas with minimal prompting or influence from the outside. For those more comfortable at the keyboard, an electronic journal may be ideal.
Here are some unconventional journal ideas:
Bullet journals
Video journals
Bible art journals
Vision boards
Mind maps

These unique journal styles usually appeal to men and women who prefer alternatives to longhand or traditional journaling. Busy people who don’t have spare time may find bullet journaling an effective way to stay on track with their creativity without sacrificing too much energy.

Journaling has benefits that come alive when you move the thoughts and ideas from your head to a journal. There are undeniable advantages to exploring the possibilities, expressing yourself and have a historical perspective on life. Journaling can give a pathway to a passion to write about, draw, or capture your biggest ideas when they have your full attention.

I would love to hear about your thoughts and experiences with journaling for an upcoming conference I am hosting for entrepreneurs and thought leaders.
Connie Ragen Green lives in Saugus and has been working exclusively on the internet since 2006. Kids and Money: Teaching Financial Responsibility and Values to Children is her latest book and was released by Hunter’s Moon Publishing in July of 2018. All of Connie’s titles are available in paperback at Amazon, at Barnes & Noble, at your local bookstore, and also for Kindle. Find out more by visiting http://HugeProfitsTinyList.com and download an audio recording for 2018 at http://NewRulesforOnlineMarketing.com.

Questions? Email Connie at crgreencrgreen@yahoo.com and be sure to put Home Business Question in the subject line. Your question and answer will be included in a future article.

Getting a Bit ‘Chili’ in the SCV

| Community | November 8, 2018

Preparations are underway for the 7th annual SCV Charity Chili Cook-Off, and organizers are looking for sponsors and contestants. The event will take place at 6 p.m. on Thursday, March 21, 2019 at The Oaks Club at Valencia (formerly the TPC).

Entrants will share their favorite chili recipes for a chance to be crowned a winner. The fee to enter the chili contest is $125, and there will be 45 contestants. Prizes will be awarded to the top three chilis in the People’s Choice and Judges Choice categories. For more information, visit scvcharitycookoff.com.

Each year event proceeds benefit a local nonprofit organization. Funds raised through the 2019 cook-off will go to two local animal shelters: Shelter Hope Pet Shop and St. Bonnie’s Sanctuary/Lange Foundation.

“With an abundance of homeless animals needing safe shelter and care, we hope our next chili cook-off will be even more successful than in years past,” said event co-founder Nicole Stinson. “It has been humbling to watch this event gain popularity each year, and I am excited to see what’s in store this time.”

Attendees will enjoy live entertainment, silent and live auctions and a 50-50 opportunity drawing.

The event begins at 6 p.m. and general admission is $25 online until February 14. After February 14 tickets will be $30. A limited number of advance-purchase VIP tickets are available for $65, which includes early entry at 5:30, one drink ticket, VIP area access, VIP parking, a swag bag and VIP hors d’oeuvres.

Sponsors to date include Schlick Art, Wolf Creek Restaurant, Silvertunes Entertainment, Logix Credit Union, HomeBridge, Finance of America, SCV Gazette, Via Promotionals, KHTS Radio, The Santa Clarita Valley Signal, Camelot Moving, Pacific Trust Escrow, Loan Depot, and Southland Regional Association of Realtors, Bank of the Sierra, Newhall Escrow, Remax of SCV, Rent Source, Salt Creek Grille, Valley Publications and The Magazine of Santa Clarita.

To become a sponsor or donor, register as a chili chef or purchase tickets, visit scvcharitychilicookoff.com or call Nicole Stinson at 661-816-4234.

Holiday Stress: Relax and Enjoy The Holidays!

| Community | November 8, 2018

A workshop, hosted by Zonta Club of Santa Clarita Valley, will provide participants with “Tips to manage daily frustration and avoid angry outbursts, ways to cope with family conflict and parenting challenges, techniques and creative activities to de-stress, seeking support at holiday time, and understanding and accepting others as they are.”

This free LifeForward workshop is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, November 10, at Savia Community Center, located at 23780 Newhall Ave in Newhall. Individuals will be able to learn how to deal with the emotion of anger, feel better about themselves and enjoy the holidays more.

Subject Matter Expert John Derenski is a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist in the San Fernando and Santa Clarita Valleys for almost 39 years. He is certified in Hypnosis Neurolinguistic Programming, and Eye Movement, and Deenstization and Reprocessing (EMDR) therapy used for Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome.

Participants are not required to register in advance, however, free childcare is available through Single Mothers Outreach (SMO) and the number of children must be registered at least one week in advance. Those interested can call SMO at (661) 288-0117. Spanish translation can also be provided with advance request.

Previous workshops in the series have helped women and attendees learn how to improve relationships and communicate more effectively, select career options and pursue meaningful employment, work on goal setting and time management, deal with anger management, set budgets and file taxes, maintain healthy eating and exercise habits, along with advice before, during and after a divorce. Workshops are designed to help participants believe in their unlimited power and potential, build the skills necessary to succeed, and be the powerful women they are meant to be. All are welcome.

Zonta offers nine free LifeForward workshops on a monthly basis (with the exception of June, July and December), in collaboration with Single Mothers Outreach, Domestic Violence Center, Returning Women Veterans and Veterans’ Wives, and the Los Angeles County Department of Child & Family Services serving foster mothers.

Workshops are organized by topics developed from surveys showing expressed interest and needs. Flyers and a schedule of upcoming workshops are posted on www.scvzonta.org for women who are interested in a particular topic. Pre-registration is not required for those who simply wish to attend a workshop, but those who wish to hold a space for the more popular workshops or obtain further information on the upcoming workshop can call (661) 288-0117.

VFW Post 6885 to Celebrate Marine Corps Birthday

| Community | November 2, 2018

VFW Post 6885 is inviting members of the community to celebrate the 243rd birthday of the Marine Corps on Saturday, November 10 at 5 p.m.

The VFW encourages residents come and celebrate the history, mission, and tradition of the Marine Corps, and enjoy traditional Marine Corps “chow,” including “SOS,” spam, bread pudding, and cake.

The Veterans of Foreign Wars Foundation was established to increase awareness of veterans’ sacrifices while promoting citizenship education, volunteerism and positive youth programs, and facilitating medical, rehabilitative, educational and employment services for veterans and their families.

VFW Post 6885 is located at 16208 Sierra Highway in Canyon Country. For more information, visit https://vfw-6885.webs.com/ or call 661-252-6885.

SCV Offers One-Day Service to Knott’s Berry Farm for ‘Military Tribute Days’

| Community | November 1, 2018

Santa Clarita residents can board Santa Clarita Transit on Saturday, November 10 for a patriotic ride to Knott’s Berry Farm. The one-day, round-trip service coincides with the theme park’s annual “Military Tribute Days” promotion, which offers free park admission to all retired or active U.S. military veterans, plus one guest.

As always, Santa Clarita Transit buses are open to the general public, so anyone can join this excursion. Residents and local veterans can board the one-day Santa Clarita Transit service at the McBean Regional Transit Center at 8:30 a.m. or the Newhall Metrolink Station at 8:45 a.m. Buses will depart Knott’s Berry Farm and head back to Santa Clarita at 5:30 p.m.

Transit fare will be waved with the donation of a canned good (minimum of one can per passenger). Without a donation, the regular fare is $3 each way, or $1.50 each way for seniors 60 and above and persons with disabilities. Don’t forget, in addition to using cash or stored value on TAP, riders can purchase their passes on their smartphones using the Token Transit app. Visit santaclaritatransit.com for details.

Upon arrival at Knott’s Berry Farm, U.S. veterans, retired and active military personnel will be required to present military ID or proof of U.S. military service to receive complimentary admission to the park. Passengers under 12 years of age must be accompanied by an adult.

For more information about Santa Clarita Transit’s one-day service to Knott’s Berry Farm, contact Santa Clarita Transit at (661) 294-1BUS (1287) or visit SantaClaritaTransit.com.

Afternoon T

| Community | November 1, 2018

Q: Everybody is doing that #thankful thing online, and I don’t know if I have a whole month of things to post. It has been a hard year in every category (job, relationships, health). This is a tough way to start the holiday season.

A: November does put a lot of pressure on folks to post laundry lists of what they have or feel when it comes to gratitude. If you’re over/underwhelmed by life and struggling to get basic needs met, then seeing the hashtags of others telling the world how #blessed they are, or reminding you to #givethanks can be tough. Forgive me. I don’t mean to sugarcoat it. It’s more than that. It’s painful. I know.

The Fickle Fairy of Fate has been zapping every category you mentioned in my house too this year, which has made it mighty difficult to see those hashtags of thanks go by when scrolling through Facebook or Instagram. Mental health experts suggest going on a digital diet, but social media plays a big role in my business and I’d miss work opportunities and such. Stepping away from the keyboard is not an option for me, but I’ve found away to watch others at their bountiful banquet table without feeling deprived. I try to think of just like being on a diet when invited to a buffet.

Making a list that starts with the tiniest grain of gratitude. Put it somewhere for your eyes only. You are not required to share the first tiny 20 items with anybody either. I’m going to share a few of mine to get you started:

Closing my eyes. Even for 10 seconds. Being removed from everything for a moment sometimes helps. I’m thankful I can do that.

Water. Whether taking time to drink a glass, wash my hands or face or the time to take a bath, I’m so happy to have water in my world.

Hot water. Giving myself permission to make or have a mug of coffee/tea/cocoa is a luxury I don’t take for granted, even if time constraints mean I’ll have to slug it down quicker than I’d like. I’m still happy to have it available.

Smiles. When someone waves me into traffic or holds a door open when my hands are full, the gesture is an even lovelier gift when accompanied by a smile. That means a lot to me.

Words. As a storyteller I like to string words together, but my heart skips multiple beats when words are presented to me. To be given words in every form, too. Written, spoken, sung … I love that! I’m not a fan of the distasteful ones, so I am a bit discriminating – but wildly appreciative of all the rest.

Time. Whether mine or someone else’s. Not a tick of an analog clock or heartbeat goes by that I don’t recognize the importance of that commodity. It’s an article of trade not always easy to come by.

You. I #givethanks and I’m #thankful for you. #blessed.
xo – t.

Now and Then – Duane Dye

| Community | November 1, 2018

Can a man be defined by words alone? If so, retired Newhall businessman Duane Dye often used these words to describe himself and his life: Nebraska farm boy, passionate Cornhusker football fan, accountant and insurance agent, proud father and leader of the Dye family clan, Rotarian, and ardent husband of soul mate and wife, Linda.

The family and friends, who gathered Sunday, Oct. 28 to celebrate Duane’s life following his death on Sept. 19, went beyond those simple phrases using words like strength of character, honesty, integrity, and a joyful and positive approach to every adversity.

That positive approach to adversity was shaped by happy times growing up on a 38,000-acre farm in Pilger, Nebraska, as well as a life-threatening battle with the scourge of his teen-age years, polio.

Duane often regaled family and friends with his farm experiences – the satisfaction of working side by side with his father planting corn seeds, watching them grow into harvestable crops, tending the horses and pigs, milking cows, and, most especially, driving the farm’s tractors, then getting his driver’s license at the age of 14.

Readily admitting that he was not much of a scholar, Duane often explained how his love of football earned him a place on the high school varsity team as a freshman. A promising athletic career was cut short at the end of his sophomore year when the team’s last two games had to be cancelled because Duane and the quarterback had both fallen victim to polio.

Duane spent five and a half months in an Omaha hospital battling the pain and paralysis with a determination and strength that he credited with making him “a different person” – one with more resolve and ambition. He refused to be pushed out of the hospital in a wheelchair, opting for leg braces and crutches. He spent the remainder of what would have been his junior year undergoing the rigors of therapy and learning to more effectively manage his everyday routines. During that time, Duane perfected the traits he had been born with – a joy of life and living, and a positive outlook on anything that life would throw at him.

With the same determination honed during his hospital stay, Duane took extra classes in his senior year to make up for the schooling he missed and was able to graduate on time with only a few credits left to make up during the summer.

Following graduation, Duane moved to the “big city” (Columbus) and got a job at a medical company. He used the money he earned to enroll in a business college in Lincoln where he earned an accounting degree. He was hired as an accountant at the Nebraska State Penitentiary, which readied him for a similar position at Wayside Honor Rancho (now Peter Pitchess Detention Center) in Castaic in 1957. Though it was difficult to leave his beloved Nebraska, its harsh winters proved too challenging for his impaired physical mobility.

At a May 2006 Rotary meeting, Linda Dye fastened a medallion around granddaughter Jennifer Brock’s neck while a proud Duane looked on. The medallion represented a $1000 donation the Dyes made in Jennifer’s name to Rotary’s World Peace Fellowship fund

During a 2006 Rotary Craft Talk, Duane described his job interview at Wayside. “I walked into the reception area in braces and the girl at the desk gave me a dubious look. I could tell the interviewer only saw the braces and was not confident in my ability to hold down a job. Undaunted, I confidently handed over my recommendations and referrals from the Nebraska penitentiary. He excused himself, went back to his office, and I could hear him talking on the telephone. A few minutes later, he came back in, convinced that I was a viable employee and gave me the job.”

No one ever questioned Duane’s abilities after that – whether it was at work, play, or volunteering in his community. In his final year working for the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department, Duane took a part time job at Newhall Plumbing while he attended insurance classes at night.

Once he secured his insurance credentials, Duane was invited by fellow insurance man and avid Rotarian, Ivan Passick, to set up a desk in his offices. Eventually he started his own business, the Duane Dye Insurance Agency. It was through Passick that Duane was first introduced to the SCV Rotary Club.

His new trade led to romance in 1965 when he met future wife Linda. As the Santa Clarita Valley grew from a sleepy hamlet into a bustling city in its own right, Duane’s business followed suit and prospered along with his family, which by the 1970s included four children.

Along with his business, his devotion to his family, and his Baha’i faith, Duane had four constants: his love of farming (that included his current Fillmore Ranch and the family homestead in Nebraska), his loyalty to his hometown of Pilger and the Nebraska Cornhuskers, a love of restoring classic Chryslers, and a commitment to rid the world of Polio.

Determined that the world’s children should not experience the pain he endured, Duane and Linda dedicated much of their charitable giving to Rotary International’s PolioPlus Campaign. Through their efforts and donations alone, 88,000 children have received the life-saving oral polio vaccines.

It was evident at the Sunday celebration of Duane’s life that it was not only his words, but his actions that defined his 86 years on this planet. And even though his last months were plagued with failing health and kidneys, the determination, resolve, and positive outlook that Duane had exhibited throughout his life never faltered and helped his anxious family cope with his final moments. In her eulogy, daughter Luanne recalled how he “wore the burdens in stoic fashion, never complaining and always reminding us of the full life we had shared.”

One of Duane’s ER doctors reminded the family of his sentimental side when he told them that he had asked Duane about the happiest moment of his life and Duane’s reply was, “The day I married Linda.”

Former Rotary president Mike Berger reminisced about Duane and Linda’s weekly support of the SCV Rotary Club and their commitment to the club motto “Service Above Self,” a sentiment that went beyond lip service to the 88,000 lives they saved through the PolioPlus program.

Close family friend, Chuck Norman, who served as Sunday’s program moderator and video biographer on Duane’s life, summed up Duane as remarkable, adding that Duane was a loyal friend and spiritual mentor through their shared Baha’i faith.

As the ceremony ended, it was evident that there was an abundance of words that defined Duane’s life – from the joys and challenges of the Nebraska farm to the fulfillment and accomplishments at the Fillmore ranch. But daughter Luanne probably summed up the predominant sentiment of the day when she ended her eulogy reminding everyone that “despite his physical challenges, my dad was always happy and upbeat and he would probably want us to remember him dressed in his best Corn Husker gear shouting in front of a televised game: “Go Big Red, Yay, Yay, Yay!”

Pardee Homes Hosts Grand Opening November 3

| Community | November 1, 2018

Pardee Homes will celebrate grand opening tomorrow, Saturday, November 3 at Skyline, the award-winning builder’s highly anticipated new community in Santa Clarita. From 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., visitors can tour 12 new home designs, listen to live music, partake in poolside entertainment, food trucks, craft beer, kids’ activities, a photo booth and more.

“Skyline is the place to be on Saturday!” said Lyndsay Fuller, Director of Sales and Marketing for Pardee Homes LA Ventura. “We look forward to welcoming everyone who has so eagerly awaited Skyline’s opening to come see us Saturday, and enjoy a fun and memorable celebration!”

To reach Skyline Saturday from 5 North, take Exit 162/14 North. Drive 5.5 miles to Exit 6A/Sierra Highway. Take a left onto Sierra Highway for .5 miles, then right onto Via Princessa. Turn right again at Whites Canyon and continue for three miles to Skyline Ranch Road. Turn right onto Skyline Road. Follow event signs for parking.

Skyline’s four debut neighborhoods are by Pardee Homes and TRI Pointe Homes, designed by award-winning architectural firms. Flexible and spacious designs respond to Skyline’s scenic hilltop site, and smart home measures boost new home performance, comfort and convenience.

Sola by Pardee will provide designs of approximately 1,882 to 2,225 square feet of living space in two-story floor plans with three to four bedrooms, from the mid $500,000s.

Celestia by TRI Pointe Homes offers one and two-story designs of approximately 2,001 to 2,596 square feet of living space and three to five bedrooms, from the high $500,000s.

Mystral by TRI Pointe features two-story designs of approximately 2,600 to 3,132 square feet of living space, with three to six bedrooms, from the mid $600,000s. Call 949-478-8607 for more on Celestia and Mystral.

Lyra by Pardee Homes offers two-story designs of approximately 2,861 to 3,506 square feet of living space, with four to seven bedrooms, from the high $600,000s. Call 661-450-6813 for more on Sola and Lyra.

Skyline features about 1600 acres of dedicated open space. Residents will be within walking distance of a new elementary school, parks, trails and recreational and social amenities. Skyline is connected to work centers, retail, dining and leisure choices, and residents are close to area freeways and Metrolink.

Award-winning Pardee Homes provides quality homes in desirable locations throughout the Los Angeles/Ventura area, and is a member of the TRI Pointe Group of regional homebuilders. Visit www.pardeehomes.com

College of the Canyons to Host McKeon Leadership Forum

| Community | November 1, 2018

College of the Canyons, the Santa Clarita Valley Economic Development Corp. and U.S. Rep. Howard P. “Buck” McKeon (Ret.) will present the Fourth Annual McKeon Leadership Forum, with a special keynote presentation from Gen. John M. Keane (Ret.), Chief of Staff and Vice Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army.

The forum will be held at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29, at the Santa Clarita Performing Arts Center.

“It is an honor to have General Keane as this year’s McKeon Leadership Forum speaker. The Forum has established itself as a community platform to promote civic dialogue and inform community members about current issues that merit our attention,” said COC Chancellor Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook. “I am grateful to Congressman McKeon for his continuous advocacy on behalf of the Santa Clarita Valley and the college. His commitment to education and public service is deeply admirable and inspiring.”

Keane’s presentation is titled “America’s Global Security Challenges.”

“General Keane is very well informed on all of the serious situations facing our country around the world,” said McKeon. “This is a wonderful opportunity to learn from his knowledge, experience, and expertise. He has devoted his life to serving our nation and our people. You’ve seen him on television, now you can see and meet him in person. I look forward to seeing you at this great event.”

Established in 2015, the McKeon Leadership Forum is a speaker series aimed at promoting civic engagement through personal involvement. Thought leaders from the world of politics, government, and military are invited to speak at the Forum in order to engage community members into dialog and inspire them to become involved in current issues. The Forum also highlights the community’s robust economic industries, such as the aerospace sector.

“The McKeon Forum continues to bring military experts to the Santa Clarita Valley and is a unique opportunity for businesses and the community to engage and learn,” said Holly Schroeder, president and CEO of the Santa Clarita Valley Economic Development Corporation. “We encourage business leaders to attend and hear directly from thought leaders about key issues facing the aerospace and defense industries.”

Conceived as an engaging, thought-provoking exchange, the Forum proposes to encourage attendees to shape the future of their community.

Admission to the McKeon Leadership Forum is free and open to the public. Complimentary parking will be available in Lots 1 and 2.

About General Jack Keane

After 37 years of public service, General Keane retired in 2003 from his appointment as acting Chief of Staff and Vice Chief of Staff of the U.S. Army. The four-star general was in the Pentagon on 9/11 and provided oversight and support for the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

Since 2004, General Keane spent a decade conducting frequent trips to Iraq and Afghanistan for senior defense officials with multiple visits during the surge period in both countries directly assisting General David Petraeus.

General Keane appears before Congress regularly, offering testimony on matters of foreign policy and national security, with his most recent testimony in May on ISIS: Post Caliphate. He serves as the senior strategic analyst for Fox News and speaks throughout the country on leadership and national security.

A combat Vietnam veteran, General Keane is a career infantry paratrooper and commanded the 101st Airborne Division and the 18th Airborne Corps, which is the Army’s largest war fighting organization.

Currently President of GSI Consulting, General Keane regularly appears before Congress to offer testimony on foreign policy and national security matters. He serves as the senior strategic analyst for Fox News and speaks throughout the country on leadership and national security.

General Keane earned his Bachelor of Science degree from Fordham University and received a Master of Arts degree from Western Kentucky University. He is a graduate of the Army War College and the Command and General Staff College. General Keane was married to the late Theresa (Terry) Keane for 51 years and has two sons, Daniel and Matthew who is deceased.

Visit www.canyons.edu to RSVP.

Grey Days – Whose Dream Is It Anyway?

| Community | October 26, 2018

by Derra Grey
I picked up my 17-year-old daughter from school like I had done hundreds of times before, but this time, she seemed especially happy.

“Our choir teacher was out today and since I have so much experience, I was asked to conduct the class.” She beamed.

“Wow, that’s really cool,” I said excitedly.

“Yeah, it was the most amazing feeling.” Her eyes sparkled in a way I hadn’t seen in a while.

I began to feel that old familiar exhilaration that had been suppressed far too long. “So, I guess you’ll pursue music in college then.”

“I plan to, as my minor,” she says defensively.

“Hey, better yet, maybe you can perform at some events coming up.” I had felt this new sense of hope, missing all the singing events we used to go to, excited she wanted to get back to her dream of becoming a professional singer.

“Mom, my decision to stop all that signing stuff hasn’t changed.”

My heart sank. It’s been difficult excepting this change in her, seeing how she is a truly talented singer and songwriter. How could she just forget all the performances she’s done? The accolades from her audiences and people in the industry? The awards she’s won? What about the moment when she sang brilliantly The National Anthem for the Lakers in front of what, 19 thousand people and wasn’t even nervous? Of course, there had been a number of false promises, and quite a few disappointments over the years, but that’s to be expected in this industry. Everyone knows you just have to hold on and keep going until that opportunity comes along that can change your life.

Even when I noticed the progressing shift in her, I kept pushing her to stay on course toward her dream. Then my husband asked me one day, “Whose dream is it anyway?”

What? Hers of course.

And then she told me she’s done trying to make it as a singing star and wanted to stop all of it.

So, we stopped going to shows, auditions and the studio. That is until the day I get a call from a producer of American Idol. She had remembered my daughter from last year when she auditioned (even though she didn’t get in). The producer wanted to give my daughter a private audition with the executive producers this year.

Suffice to say, I was ecstatic, but worried she’d want to pass on this opportunity. When I went to tell her about the call, I assured her that this was a chance of a lifetime and it could just be that chance to change everything. Imagine my surprise when she actually agreed to do it, thinking this could be her last try at it, admitting she hoped she’d get cast on the show.

It was thrilling watching her practicing again, getting ready for the big day. On audition day, she went into that room and blew the roof off the place. People in the waiting room said to me, “What? That’s her? She’s incredible.”

The producers told her they’d be calling within a couple of weeks for callbacks and we left. But we knew full well it was the end of the road. She had been on enough of these reality show auditions to know if they don’t ask you to stay, you are done.

When we got in the car she looked at me and said, “I did it, right?”

“Yes! And you did amazing.” My heart was aching. I had so wanted this chance for her; to prove that she belongs on stage. I remembered when she was eight and sang a song she wrote for the very first time on stage at a charity event. How the people in the audience held up their phones to light up the room as she sang, some people even cried. When she came off the stage, after a standing ovation, she looked up at me beaming. “That’s where I belong,” she told me.

“Ok, well, I’m done now.” My daughter looks as sad as I feel.

“You mean like done with just these auditions?”

“No, like all of it. I admit I hoped something would finally happen, but it didn’t, again. I don’t want to feel bad anymore, like I’m not good enough. I mean, I’m glad I tried, we tried, but since I’ve stopped, I’ve been feeling really good about myself and it’s not like I don’t sing anymore, I sing in Choir and I love it. What I need now is to pursue things that make sense to me.”

“I just think you still could make it big if we’d keep going.”

“Mom, please, I know it’s still your dream for me, but it’s not mine anymore.”

“But it was your dream.” I insist.

“Yeah, it was. I did want it, really bad, but I can’t be distracted by it anymore. It isn’t going anywhere and I’ve tried, really tried for years. Now I want other things, things I can actually attain.”

“Some parents see their children as extensions of themselves, rather than as separate people with their own hopes and dreams’’ said Brad Bushman, a professor of psychology at Ohio State University.

I decided to speak to other parents who were going through similar situations with their kids. I was quite surprised at how many parents dreams for their kids weren’t at all what their kids wanted for themselves.

One of the parents, Jim, had been struggling with his son quitting football. Jim, himself, had once dreamed of playing professional football, but he didn’t get the chance. And when he had a son, he brought him up to play and found his son was really good at it. Jim felt fulfilled and happy, especially when his boy was being scouted and getting offers to play professionally.

Then one day his son broke down, worried he’d disappoint his father but managed to tell him he wanted to stop playing football, it just wasn’t what he wanted to do with his life. Jim was beyond devastated and still to this day can hardly speak about it without choking up.

Jim’s son is now in college, pursuing a business degree.

For me, I’ve come to let go of what I wanted for her and embrace the fact that this is my daughter’s life, not mine, and that she has her own dreams.

Of course, I am grateful for the times she does sing. That is, on her own terms.

Hart District Looking for Measure SA Oversight Committee Members

| Community | October 25, 2018

The William S. Hart Union High School District is searching for two new members of the Measure SA Citizens’ Oversight Committee. These members will serve a two-year term with a maximum of three consecutive terms.

The first member the committee is looking for is someone who would fit in the Business Organization category. In other words, this member needs to be active in the business community within the Hart School District. The second member would be a person who has a child in the District and is currently part of a parent organization.

Employees, contractors, vendors and consultants of the William S. Hart Union High School District are not eligible to be on the committee.

Measure SA is a $300 million general obligation bond passed by voters in Santa Clarita in November, 2008. Its purpose is to fund construction projects such as the new Castaic High School, Performing Arts Centers at Canyon and Saugus High Schools, and improvement projects at other high schools and junior highs.

The application for the Measure SA Citizens’ Oversight Committee can be found online at https://4.files.edl.io/4c3d/10/23/18/154838-9e60c76c-5352-47dc-a09e-d6bee7f00b4b.pdf. All completed applications must be sent to Lisa Arnone (larnone@hartdistrict.org) by Friday, November 16, at 4 p.m.

Now and Then

| Community | October 25, 2018

Ready or not, the holiday season is upon us. If the black and orange candy displays in the grocery stores have not melted your chocolate defenses, then surely you have fallen captive to the gnarled witches, all a glitter in purple and green, as they spring to life and cackle when you wheel your cart next to them in the hardware aisles.

A sure sign that Halloween is just around the corner and Thanksgiving and Christmas are only a few blocks away. The blustery Santa Anas become a harbinger of change. Time seems to speed up, shortening our daylight hours as the winds gust through the valley, robbing trees of their leaves and branches. And even though we grumble when we see the red and green decorations invading the store windows in late October, we know we have to get busy or January 1 will dawn bright and sunny with a list full of forgotten holiday chores tangled in the discarded wrapping paper and ribbons.

In an effort to sweep away our procrastination cobwebs, the SCV Boys and Girls Club has begun sending out invitations to one of the season’s glittering traditions – the annual Festival of Trees.

For three sparkling days in November (Friday the 16th through Sunday the 18th), guests can wander through a forest of colorfully lit Christmas trees, watch their children create crafts in the Kids’ Corner, dance till their feet give out, be entertained by musicians, dancers, and strolling magicians, shop at a holiday boutique, and bid on their favorite decorated trees while sampling gourmet foods.

Guaranteed to get any Scrooge in the holiday spirit, the annual Festival will be held at The Centre, 20880 Centre Point Parkway in Saugus.

The event was created in 2003 as a fund-raiser for the Boys and Girls Club by longtime supporters, Gary and Myrna Condie. The Condies, who are no strangers to the SCV volunteer scene, also wear the mantles of SCV Man and Woman of the Year – Gary earning the honor in 2005 and Myrna in 2012.

Born on a frigid New Year’s Day in 1944, Gary Condie, the eldest of four children, spent the first five years of his life in Preston, Idaho, a small town in the southeast part of the state. But the majority of his childhood was spent on a farm in the Blackfoot River area, bordered by an Indian reservation on one bank and a town of the other. While the farm boy enjoyed riding horses and tractors, his overwhelming passion was for baseball – a passion that has grown over the years making him one of the L.A. Dodgers biggest fans.

Following graduation from high school, Gary’s desire to see the world prompted him to forgo a scholarship to Idaho College in favor of a two-and-a-half year mission in Germany for the Mormon Church. Gary returned to the United States in 1965 to pursue an accounting degree at Utah State and it was there that he met an attractive co-ed named Myrna Richardson.

The fourth of 10 children, Myrna was born in Jackson Hole, Wyoming and attended Jackson Wilson High School where she was voted prom queen and class secretary in her senior year. In the fall of 1965, Myrna left home to attend Utah State and it was in her second year of college that she met Gary. The two married in June of 1967, and after spending the summer managing a lodge in Jackson Hole, the newlyweds transferred to Brigham Young University where they both continued their schooling.

In 1974, Myrna and Gary moved to Valencia with their five-year-old daughter Heather. While Myrna taught sewing and earned a name for herself designing bridal gowns, prom dresses, evening wear, and elaborate costumes, Gary managed his own growing accounting practice.

The Condies soon discovered that the Santa Clarita Valley was more than an idyllic place to do business and raise a family, it was also a volunteer magnet. Gary began his volunteer “career” as a member of the Hart High School District’s advisory board and the Citizen’s Advisory Group on Water. In 1976, he began working on the Boys and Girls Club auction while also helping to raise money for the Henry Mayo Newhall Memorial Hospital helipad. In rapid succession, Gary became a founding president of the hospital’s foundation, a founding member and president of the Boys and Girls Club Foundation, president of the B&G board, and board member of the Santa Clarita Facilities Foundation for the William S. Hart District.

In the meantime, Myrna not only followed her husband enthusiastically into the volunteer scene but also coordinated her efforts as housewife, mother, and foster mother with her fashion design business. The focus of her volunteer work focused on the Boys and Girls Club and College of the Canyons. Besides founding the SCV Festival of Trees, she is a co-founder of the Boys & Girls Club Foundation, and a past co-chair of the COC Silver Spur Celebration.

Myrna has also been honored as the 2009 California Mother of the Year, 2006 Boy Scouts of America Leader of Character, 2004 SCV Boys & Girls Club Samuel Dixon Award, 2001 B&G Club Foundation Board Member of the Year, and has the COC Performing Arts Center Costume Shop named for her.

The Condies travel in their spare time and spend many hours visiting with foster children and extended family – and not many in this valley have missed out on seeing Gary’s extensive Dodger memorabilia in person or by Facebook post. In addition, Gary and Myrna continue to support valley charities as well as the Festival of Trees, which has grown in scope and popularity since the first event debuted 15 years ago.

For Festival tickets and event times and information, one may contact resource development director, Ali Campbell, 661-254-2582, ext. 114, alic@sbvbgc.org or follow the updates on the Festival of Trees Facebook page.

Grand Opening Set For November 3 at Skyline

| Community | October 25, 2018

On Saturday, November 3, Pardee Homes will be hosting a grand opening celebration for its new Skyline community. Festivities will include model tours of 12 new home designs, activities for all ages at The Lookout recreational center, music, refreshments, and more. Pardee invites new home shoppers to visit Skyline’s website now, and register on the Interest List.

“Sign-up at www.LifeAtSkyline.com,” said Lyndsay Fuller, Director of Sales and Marketing for Pardee Homes LA Ventura. “Interest List members are part of a select group that is first to get more details about our grand opening and available new homes. Shoppers can begin pre-qualifying for a new home loan with TRI Pointe Connect.”

Skyline’s four debut neighborhoods are by Pardee Homes and TRI Pointe Homes, designed by award-winning architectural firms. Flexible and spacious designs respond to Skyline’s scenic hilltop site, and smart home measures boost new home performance, comfort and convenience.

Sola by Pardee will provide designs of approximately 1,882 to 2,225 square feet of living space in two-story floorplans with three to four bedrooms, from the mid $500,000s.

Celestia by TRI Pointe Homes offers one- and two-story designs of approximately 2,001 to 2,596 square feet of living space and three to five bedrooms, from the high $500,000s.

Mystral by TRI Pointe features two-story designs of approximately 2,600 to 3,132 square feet of living space, with three to six bedrooms, from the mid $600,000s. Call 949-478-8607 for more on Celestia and Mystral.

Lyra by Pardee Homes offers two-story designs of approximately 2,861 to 3,506 square feet of living space, with four to seven bedrooms, from the high $600,000s. Call 661-450-6813 for more on Sola and Lyra.

Skyline features about 1600 acres of dedicated open space. Residents will be within walking distance of a new elementary school, parks, trails and recreational and social amenities. Skyline is well connected to work centers, retail, dining and leisure choices, and residents are close to area freeways and Metrolink.

For Skyline’s November 3 grand opening: From 5 North, Exit 162/14 North. Drive 5.5 miles to Exit 6A/Sierra Highway. Left onto Sierra Highway for .5 miles, then right onto Via Princessa. Turn right again at Whites Canyon and continue for three miles to Skyline Ranch Road. Turn right onto Skyline Road. Follow event signs for parking.

Award-winning Pardee Homes provides quality homes in desirable locations throughout the Los Angeles/Ventura area, and is a member of the TRI Pointe Group of regional homebuilders. www.pardeehomes.com

Business Insights with Michael D. Preston – ‘Step 1 in Business Development’

| Community | October 25, 2018

by Michael D. Preston

Hello, and thanks for making the time to read Business Insights with Michael D. Preston. I am a Licensed Business Broker and Business Coach that works locally, as well as a fourth-generation entrepreneur who has owned and operated a number of my own businesses. My goal with this column is to provide you with the help and insights you need to build a stronger, more profitable business.

Small businesses are the backbone of our community and economy, and my passion is helping people reach their potential and grow their business. Many people talk about wanting to own and run their own business. Lucky for us, in this country, opening a business is easy to do, but keeping it running and profitable can be far more difficult. So, I am here to take the mystery out of where to focus your time and invest your resources.

In today’s article, we are going to touch on the single most important factor in your success – your mindset or attitude.

Does that sound crazy? Surely, it must be how to manage your people or understanding your customer. There is no question they are extremely important topics (and we will be spending time on those and many more) but how you approach your tasks and challenges far outweighs those every time.

Imagine you have the choice to hire either A, a candidate that already knows everything you need them to but they don’t really seem to care about working hard and they are negative day in and day out, or B, Someone that has limited knowledge but they are driven to be the best they can be, are great team players and they come with a “we shall over come any challenge” attitude. Who would you hire?

These days, knowledge is easily accessible but finding the person that has a never say quit attitude is, unfortunately, in short supply. Okay, so it is making sense – but how do we improve in this area and make ourselves better equipped to be the difference makers we aspire to be? To begin, with we must have an open mind. Realize nobody knows everything and that we all have blind spots that require us to break down our current ways of doing things so that we can start again doing things in a different way in order to achieve better and more profitable results.

The first step is to identify who we aspire to be, then list out all of the attributes you will expect to see from your new self (include the attitudes, knowledge and skills).

Next, prioritize your list and build a plan to work on the top three. Identify actions you can take to improve in each area and be relentless in making them a reality.

Don’t expect they will get done automatically – add deadlines to implement then and find someone you can trust to check in on you and hold you accountable to making the changes. Work at these improvements every chance you get. Life is a full-time sport and we get no plays off. It won’t take long before you see powerful and impactful changes if you just stay the course and refuse to accept anything less than your best.

Setbacks are inevitable, as you fall back into old habits. Don’t beat yourself up, just recommit yourself to your mission, get back on your new path and keep pushing forward. You are now on your way to a transformation and better, more powerful results. I would love to hear about your journey! To your continued success!

Michael D. Preston is a licensed business broker that is committed to helping business owners increase their valuation and sell their business. You can contact him at Michael@InflectiveGrowth.com

Community Invited to Celebrate ECE with Movie Under the Stars

| Community, Entertainment | October 19, 2018

In celebration of the 10-year anniversary of the Canyon Country Campus Center for Early Childhood Education, the public is invited to an outdoor movie night and open house.

This free event will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26, in the Canyon Country campus’ Carl A. Rasmussen Amphitheater.

“We always enjoy the opportunity to showcase the Canyon Country campus to our community,” said Dr. Ryan Theule, Vice President, Canyon Country Campus & Grants Development. “This event is particularly special as we celebrate 10 years of operation of the Center for Early Childhood Education at CCC.”

Starting at 5 p.m., guests are invited to enjoy a presentation on the Center for Early Childhood Education, located in Room 200.

“Over the past 10 years, our Center team has served over 215 children and families and provided essential quality workforce skills for approximately 150 Early Childhood Education Students,” said Monica Marshall, Program Director of the college’s Center for Early Childhood Education. “We provide the connection between theory, child growth and development, and best practices.”
“This will be a very special evening in honor of our Canyon Country Center’s 10-year anniversary,” added Marshall. “We hope you will join us in celebration of our program and this important milestone.”

Following the ECE Open House, families can enjoy a variety of children’s activities beginning at 6 p.m., along with a live performance from the COC dance group Ballet Folklórico Tesoro Mestizo. The group seeks to honor Mexican Folk dance, promote diversity and contribute to the understanding of Mexican culture.

A screening of the feature film, “Coco” will begin at 7 p.m.

The movie, free snacks and free raffle are presented by the COC Canyon Country Campus, the Center for Early Childhood Education and the Associated Student Government. Food and beverages will also be available for purchase at the event from Keep on Grubbin’ food truck.

The Canyon Country campus is located at 17200 Sierra Highway. For more information, visit the Canyon Country campus web page.

In celebration of the 10-year anniversary of the Canyon Country Campus Center for Early Childhood Education, the public is invited to an outdoor movie night and open house.

This free event will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 26, in the Canyon Country campus’ Carl A. Rasmussen Amphitheater.

“We always enjoy the opportunity to showcase the Canyon Country campus to our community,” said Dr. Ryan Theule, Vice Precisdent, Canyon Country Campus & Grants Development. “This event is particularly special as we celebrate 10 years of operation of the Center for Early Childhood Education at CCC.”

Starting at 5 p.m., guests are invited to enjoy a presentation on the Center for Early Childhood Education, located in Room 200.

“Over the past 10 years our Center team has served over 215 children and families and provided essential quality workforce skills for approximately 150 Early Childhood Education Students,” said Monica Marshall, Program Director of the college’s Center for Early Childhood Education. “We provide the connection between theory, child growth and development, and best practices.”

“This will be a very special evening in honor of our Canyon Country Center’s 10-year anniversary,” added Marshall. “We hope you will join us in celebration of our program and this important milestone.”

Following the ECE Open House, families can enjoy a variety of children’s activities beginning at 6 p.m., along with a live performance from the COC dance group Ballet Folklórico Tesoro Mestizo. The group seeks to honor Mexican Folk dance, promote diversity and contribute to the understanding of Mexican culture.

A screening of the feature film, “Coco” will begin at 7 p.m.

The movie, free snacks and free raffle are presented by the COC Canyon Country Campus, the Center for Early Childhood Education and the Associated Student Government.

Food and beverages will also be available for purchase at the event from Keep on Grubbin food truck.

The Canyon Country campus is located at 17200 Sierra Highway.

For more information, visit the Canyon Country campus web page at www.canyons.edu/Offices/CCC.

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Doug’s Rant – Video Edition

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