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Santa Clarita Gazette and Free Classifieds is a locally owned weekly publication. Each week you will find news, opinion, sports and more plus over 200 classified ads online and in print! Each week’s issue is printed and distributed on Thursdays and Fridays, the full edition is also here on the web site on Thursdays as a page flip. All of the articles and classified ads are online and display ads are printed and appear on various pages of the web site to correspond with the print ad.

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Posts / Recent blog posts

Say Something, Not Just Anything!

| Opinion | April 2, 2020

by Paul Raggio

In moments of great, societal peril, I think of General Eisenhower talking to the 101st Airborne before the Screaming Eagles climbed into their C-47 aircraft with orders to jump into Normandy. Certainly, Ike knew many would not survive the jump, and many more would perish in the ground battle that would follow. But this didn’t stop him from seeing his paratroopers, nor communicating the importance of their mission and how much he cared for them. Historical films show him walking among the troopers the evening before D-Day, talking, laughing, patting them on their shoulders and backs, providing words of encouragement, and on occasion, a hug. He was saying something to them, but not just anything. Words, yes, but so much more. It was his presence and vision that calmed the troops, allowing them to release pent up anxiety, permission to expose their fear, and a chance to revel in a world to come because of their doing. He gave them purpose. This is what leaders communicate in times of crisis.

Lisa and I presented a webinar last week hosted by the SCV Valley Industrial Association, titled “How SCV Business Owners Can Lead, Think, Plan, and Act Through COVID-19.” It was our first of what we anticipate will be many. In that presentation we emphasized the importance of leaders communicating clear, direct, purposeful and inspirational messages to their family, team, customers and any other stakeholders they come in contact with. Leaders, right now, should be delivering informative, positive and inspirational messages that calm and reassure their constituents that we will get through this together, and projecting an enduring vision of growth and prosperity, and most importantly, giving them purpose.

A crisis like COVID-19 is a time when you must show up as a leader and demonstrate your company’s values by what and how you communicate. Organizations that handle crisis communications well are proactive in their messaging and connect regularly with their internal and external audiences. This is not a time to be silent nor let your messages be created by default. Better to err on the side of over-communicating than not. Take time to first examine your intentions and get clear on your “WHY” regarding what you want to say and then add doses of positivity, passion and enthusiasm so it will inspire solutions. On a routine basis communicate these purposeful messages to all your team, including staff, customers, clients, suppliers, stakeholders, networks, strategic alliances and partnerships.

Communication isn’t just words, it’s actions too. Like many other crises in the past, COVID-19 has the potential to bond more of us around common causes. We can look to our faith-based, service and nonprofit organizations and ask what they need, how we can help and encourage and unite our teams and audiences to get engaged and make a difference to those in need. Think in terms of our collective impact and remember we are all in this together, one team, one fight, one mission, to survive COVID-19 physically, mentally and economically.

If you are like us, you’re having to adapt to this virtual environment, learning new words and activities like zoom, go-to, webinars, webcasts, WebEx’s, and the like, all in pursuit of remotely engaging our stakeholders and customers. This is the new normal, and likely a permanent change in the way we do business. Why not consider this an opportunity and new approach to promote your business? So, if your business has vision, mission and purpose statements, now is the time to update and revise them, then message that in your virtual meetings and conference calls and on your emails, social media, direct mailers, and newsletters. If your business hasn’t developed these essential things, take the time and do so now, it will be extremely important when the rebound occurs.

During this time of crisis and uncertainty, be that leader through your virtual presence that says something, but not just anything, to calm your troops, allowing them to release pent up anxiety, permission to expose their fear, and a chance to revel in a world to come because of their doing. Give them vision and purpose. This is what a leader communicates in times of crisis. Now let’s get after it!

Paul Raggio is co-owner, with his sister Lisa, of One True North INC Leadership and Business Coaching Solutions, a service disabled, veteran owned, family operated firm based in Santa Clarita, California, and they are certified business coaches for ActionCOACH, the number one business coaching service in the world. Paul and Lisa mentor and coach business owners and their employees on leadership and management principles in achieving and sustaining their business growth and profitability goals. Email him at paulraggio@actioncoach.com or go to his website at www.paulraggio.actioncoach.com.

Freedom and Free Enterprise: Casualties of Coronavirus War?

| Opinion | April 2, 2020

by Rob Werner

Consequences of the Coronavirus War include lost civil rights, elimination of property rights, and massive government power.

Progressives perpetually glorify people’s rights but in reaction to disasters promote surrender. They have little faith people can solve their own problems

Our Great Depression led to Roosevelt’s progressive administration. Income tax rate advanced to 94 percent (Roosevelt didn’t achieve his desired 100 percent rate for incomes over $25,000.) Inheritance tax went to 77 percent. Progressive’s cure for the depression was suppression of wealth and private spending and replacing it with big daddy government. We achieved government dependency and depression until WWII.

During WWII, progressives dictated what news the press covered. These promoters of liberty favored incarcerating Japanese and German Americans.

The Progressives’ reaction to the Coronavirus War is to push the president to utilize war powers and authoritarian actions and abandon guaranteed rights and free enterprise. There is an excitement among their ranks with a realization that government power is almost absolute and when they take back the Presidency, they will via Executive Orders be able to restructure our economic and political systems.

Democrats debate between Sander’s type of socialism with nationalized industries and the National Socialism with industrial control via government investments and political partnerships.
We’re informed that there’s a shortage of masks and ventilators needed for treatment. The U.S. has a mask reserve for pandemics. During the Obama administration, the swine flu epidemic utilized 100 million from reserves. Obama failed to replace them. New York’s Governor Cuomo demanded that ventilators be provided by the Feds immediately and implied that Trump could solve this by using war powers to take over industries and force their immediate manufacture. What Cuomo doesn’t say is that in 2015 his administration refused purchasing 16,000 recommended as necessary to prepare for a pandemic. Nor does he acknowledge that government management slows industrial production.

A President Bernie Sanders would have nationalized airlines and other businesses, guaranteed public housing and “free” medical care for everyone. Information related to shortages and delays would be suppressed as against public interest.

The Obama – Biden – Clinton faction would bail out business with government controls making them servants to a political – expectantly partisan purpose.

The Republicans face a moral dilemma. They recognize that the economy must be shored up to prevent a depression. But they’re uncomfortable with the abuse of liberties and government power. They know that quick action is required. They recognize no legislation occurs without Pelosi’s approval. No approval comes without including leftist goals.

The resulting legislation helps and hurts our economy. While infusing trillions of dollars into our economy, we get a three hundred fifty million immigrant welfare package and unemployment benefits containing financial incentives to remain unemployed. We have numerous pork barrels like twenty-five million to the Kennedy Center and seventy-five million to public broadcasting.

Democrats want to bail out the postal service, force more businesses to unionize, and make vote harvesting (people depositing hundreds of ballots) national. Pelosi’s still pushing additional funding for Planned Parenthood’s abortions.

We need to remember that government is spending unearned funds, money produced by manipulation rather than productivity. Ultimately the cost will be borne by working Americans.

We’ll get over this virus. But we’ve opened a Pandora’s Box that exposes us to massive government power, planting seeds for greater dependency and government dictation over our business and personal lives. We risk some future president confiscating our property and liberty rationalizing it is for the greater good.

Bad Boys and Girls

| Police Blotter | April 2, 2020

This week, a 29-year-old North Hollywood resident was arrested for cruelty to a child likely to produce great bodily injury or death.

There were many individuals charged with corporal injury on a spouse/cohabitant, including a 46-year-old Newhall resident, a 22-year-old in-home care worker from West Hills, a 27-year-old manufacturer from Lancaster, and a 37-year-old accountant from Saugus.

Four individuals were arrested for terrorizing/causing fear, including a 54-year-old electric union worker from Santa Clarita, a 42-year-old unemployed Santa Clarita resident, a 55-year-old plumber from Santa Clarita, and a 50-year-old Lebec resident.

A 19-year-old sales clerk was brought up on charges of embezzling an amount valued greater than $400.

Several individuals where brought up on charges related to controlled substances, including the following:

25-year-old transient for possession of a controlled substance
42-year-old transient for possession of a controlled substance
26-year-old transient for possession of a controlled substance
34-year-old unemployed man for possession of a device/paraphernalia
38-year-old chef for possession of a schedule III/IV/V narcotic
30-year-old unemployed female for being under influence of a controlled substance
46-year-old unemployed Pennsylvania man for being under the influence of a controlled substance

DUIs with prior arrests went to:

41-year-old from Saugus who works in tech
19-year-old unemployed Santa Clarita resident
54-year-old from Reseda

Keep Walking

| Opinion | April 2, 2020

by Dale Paule

Here’s a handy piece of advice I heard recently, which is especially appropriate to the scary situation we now find ourselves in: “If you find yourself walking through hell; keep walking!”

That scary situation terrifying our whole world is called “Coronavirus,” and is as close to hell as we’ve ever come. One moment, America, along with most of the world, was experiencing the formally unheard of promise for a bright, happy future. Then, in the blink of an eye, that bright light was extinguished and replaced by darkness, despair and fear.

It began by China allowing the evil killer-virus to spill rapidly over its borders into countries throughout the world; all within a few weeks. I don’t need to list the economic damage done to the world; you hear it constantly pouring out of your radio and television, day and night since it began. We’ve now seen and felt the effects of the damage, both economically and psychologically, that this viral menace can do, and will continue to do until we resolve to defeat it!

Immediately, thousands of brave and brilliant doctors and technicians began working non-stop, ignoring the danger to themselves, to develop weapons that will end this silent killer’s hunger for life. But until that happens, and until we can finally see the light of victory at the end of a very long and dark tunnel, the psychological damage it’s causing is at least as devastating as its economic effect.

It’s a helpless feeling, not unlike that of a parent pacing back and forth outside of an operating room, waiting for the doctor to come out of surgery with word of their child’s chances of survival following a horrible accident or illness.
So, until this killer is stopped, “keep walking” might be the best way to help quell our fears created by this silent enemy.

It won’t keep the virus from attacking, but it might keep us from lingering, frozen with fear until all hope is lost, and remind us to keep moving toward that light at the end of the tunnel until we’re finally out of it! Fear doesn’t like a moving target; it makes it hard to get its grip on you.

There’s another saying that has helped us make it through a few tough spots.
“Whatever is going to happen, will either be worse than you imagine, or better; but it will never be exactly like you’ve imagined it, so let it happen, then deal with whichever it is!”

And our track record for dealing with tough spots is pretty good!

See you at the end of the tunnel.

Camelot Movers – Local Hero!

| Community | April 2, 2020

We got a call from the local homeless shelter, a nonprofit org, capacity 60 beds. The County is requiring them to create more space between beds, in line with current social distancing requirements. In order to comply they need to move from their present location to a city recreation center a few miles away … immediately.

They knew who to call. We’re taking care of it. And, it’s on us. No charge.

A big thank you to Alex, Tyler & Juan on the front lines today, each in mask, gloves and with a bottle of hand sanitizer in his pocket, helping the City’s local heroes that work at the Shelter! And thanks Billy Kornfeld!

Give them a call – Camelot Movers, 661-255-3112,
www.camelotmovers.com

Garcia Secures Endorsements of All Mayors in the District

| News | April 2, 2020

Santa Clarita Mayor Cameron Smyth and Palmdale Mayor Steve Hofbauer Endorse Garcia

Mike Garcia, former Navy fighter pilot and Republican candidate for CA-25, the endorsement of Santa Clarita Mayor Cameron Smyth and Palmdale Mayor Steve Hofbauer. These endorsements come on the heels of endorsements from the other three major city mayors in the 25th Congressional District.

“I am excited to endorse Mike Garcia for Congress. As a highly decorated Navy fighter pilot and long-time Santa Clarita resident, I have no doubt Mike is the right person to send to Washington D.C. and fight for our community,” Santa Clarita Mayor Cameron Smyth said.

“Palmdale and our surrounding communities are being crushed under the weight of high taxes,” Palmdale Mayor Steve Hofbauer said. “I am endorsing Mike because he is an outsider who doesn’t want California-style polices to destroy America.”

Mayor Smyth and Mayor Hofbauer join Mayor Keith Mashburn of Simi Valley, Mayor R. Rex Parris of Lancaster and Agua Dulce Town Council President Don Henry, meaning Garcia has secured all five major city endorsements in the 25th Congressional District.

“Our campaign continues gaining momentum because people agree that our taxes in California are out of control and we must lower them,” Garcia said. “Christy Smith is a Sacramento career politician who wants to take California’s dysfunctional tax-raising policies to Washington, and we can’t let that happen.”

On The Town With Jason Downs

| Community, Entertainment | April 2, 2020

Or perhaps we should call this column On the Down Low for the foreseeable future, friends, since we’re all keeping a low profile these days. There’s not much going on around town as we embark on the unknown together during these historic times. Still, fellow Santa Claritans, we are extremely fortunate to live in this town, in this county and this great state. We can be proud of our leadership and proud of each other for meeting these unusual circumstances with speed, an open mind, and love.

As everything has closed around town, we all find ourselves in the same boat, asking the same questions, and adjusting to this new reality.

What? We have time on our hands?

What? I don’t have to drive the kids all over town and be at this meeting by when and across town by then?

What? I don’t have to sit in traffic for three hours a day? I can work from home, school from home, and sleep a little more?

This is perhaps the magic ‘pause button’ we’ve all wished we could press from time to time, yes?

It’s unfortunate it takes something like a global pandemic to force the world to slow down and take stock of itself, but let’s take this opportunity, folks. While the wellbeing of our families and friends is top priority (and the very reason we’ve all taken such drastic measures to protect each other), this unprecedented moment in history could also be a once in a lifetime chance to regroup, rethink, refresh, revitalize, reorganize, and reimagine ourselves and our lives.

Again, taking the spread of this virus as seriously as possible is paramount, but it gives me real joy to go on my daily run and pass multiple families along the way. It used to be that only a couple a weeks ago I would pass a total of three people on a three mile run. Now, I’m passing three and four full and complete families along the way…and I don’t just mean core family units, I’m talking multi-generational families out for a stroll in the sunshine. This is a beautiful thing. Grandparents walking hand in hand with grandkids while mom and dad push the stroller. Talking, laughing, meandering. No one’s in a hurry. This is a silver lining if I’ve ever seen one.

As my wife and I ran past the park (something we don’t usually get to do together either), there were kids proudly doing cartwheels for their mom, dogs catching frisbees, and a family playing a baseball game. I don’t wish for anyone to suffer during this pandemic, or ever, but the nuclear family has been suffering at the hands of our nonstop, hustling-bustling society for years now and this global emergency could go far toward healing the issue. That would be my wish, anyhow.

As far as things to do with each other, the kids and I helped completely redecorate the dining room in anticipation of my wife working from home beginning this week. Her request was Hogwarts and Harry Potter themed. We had a lot of fun and the result was better than any of us expected.

Over the past week or so the family ratatouille recipe was perfected, oh yes, cookies were baked, and french toast was elevated to new heights with the use of croissant bread. (I believe I stumbled upon the greatest thing to happen to french toast since sliced bread: FRENCH French Toast, I call it!)

In addition to his ‘distance learning’ school work, I gave my son an assignment which has turned out to be a lot of fun as well. His orders were to play with every single toy in his room at least once, and decide whether to keep it or donate it. He has since pulled out tons of untouched toys from under his bed and chest of drawers. We’ve laughed at some of the amazing discoveries and old favorites he’s uncovered from the dark recesses. Who knew cleaning and reorganizing his room could be so fun! (Wink, wink.)

The wife and kids took an impromptu trip to the beach today, which allowed me some quiet time to sit and write this column…the screen door open, birds chirping, and the fresh green leaves we’ve gotten from all this amazing rain up against a robin’s egg sky and billowy white clouds…it doesn’t get much better, folks. For now, at this very moment, no one I know has been harmed by COVID-19 and it’s hard not to feel exceedingly lucky during this strangely stolen, yet solemn, more silent than usual spring season.

Love, safety and health to you and yours. Never since the dawn of man has the entire race found itself bound together for one cause the way we do today. Let’s be our best selves and arise from this collectively better than when it started.

So, there it is for this week, friends. Always feel free to let me know what you’re up to, especially during this unusual time; or if you simply want my wife’s ratatouille recipe.
(reachjasondowns@santaclaritagazette.com)

Until next time, bon voyage, break a leg, and bon appetit!

Doctor’s Diary – COVID-19: Having an End-of-Life discussion, now

| Community | April 2, 2020

There are horror stories around the world.  Not enough medical life-saving equipment, with difficult decisions who will live and who will die.

Do you know what you or your loved ones want?  Have you had an end-of-life discussion?

Many older adults want everything done if their life is threatened:  CPR, chest compressions, blood pressure support, intubation (on a ventilator), fluids, antibiotics, and feedings.  Others do not want heroic measures because they have “lived a good life.”

Some have placed their wishes in legal documents including Advanced Directives, Durable Power of Attorney, POLSTs, living wills, DNR/DNI orders, Five Wishes, etc.

If you have not heard of these documents, there is a possibility you have not had an end-of-life discussion.

Ultimately, what do you want when you face end-of-life?  If you are incapacitated, who do you want to make medical decisions, and what legal documents will communicate your desires insuring your voice is heard?

During this trying crisis, if you want any say or control, you should have this discussion now.

Gene Uzawa Dorio, M.D.

Santa Clarita Transit to Reduce Bus Service

| Community | April 2, 2020

Santa Clarita Transit To Reduce Bus Service And Continue Enhanced Cleaning Procedures In Response To Coronavirus Pandemic

In response to the Safer at Home order announced by the City of Los Angeles on March 20, Santa Clarita Transit has experienced significant decreases in ridership aboard the city’s commuter bus services to Century City, downtown Los Angeles and Warner Center. In an effort to balance the reduced need for public transit with the necessary service for passengers traveling to essential employment, Santa Clarita Transit will be reducing the number of trips operating outside Santa Clarita. This consolidated schedule will continue until further direction has been provided.

The following trips will be suspended:
Santa Clarita to Downtown Los Angeles- 5:06a.m., 5:21a.m., 5:51a.m., 6:16a.m. and 3:20p.m.
Downtown Los Angeles to Santa Clarita- 7:15a.m., 8:00a.m., 9:00a.m., 3:42p.m., 4:17a.m., 4:32p.m., 5:02p.m. and 5:17p.m.
Santa Clarita to Century City- 6:16a.m., 6:31a.m., 2:54p.m. and 3:29p.m.
Century City to Santa Clarita- 8:15a.m., 4:10p.m. and 5:10p.m.
Santa Clarita to Warner Center- 5:00a.m. and 6:23a.m.
Warner Center to Santa Clarita- 6:15a.m., 7:57a.m., 4:05p.m. and 5:00p.m.

The following trips will remain unaffected:
Santa Clarita to Downtown Los Angeles- 4:55a.m. ,5:36a.m., 6:01a.m., 6:31a.m., 6:51a.m., 4:20p.m. and 5:12p.m.
Downtown Los Angeles to Santa Clarita- 6:50a.m., 3:22p.m., 4:02p.m., 4:47p.m., 6:00p.m. and 6:45p.m.
Santa Clarita to Century City- 5:00a.m., 5:14a.m., 5:29a.m., 5:44a.m., 6:46a.m., 2:59p.m. and 3:59p.m.
Century City to Santa Clarita- 6:50a.m., 7:04a.m., 7:47a.m., 3:45p.m., 4:40p.m., 5:40p.m., 6:40p.m. and 7:45p.m.
Santa Clarita to Warner Center- 5:24a.m., 5:56a.m., 6:53a.m., 2:20p.m., 3:35p.m. and 5:02p.m.
Warner Center to Santa Clarita- 6:50a.m., 7:20a.m., 8:30a.m. 3:35p.m., 4:30p.m. and 6:20p.m.

“Even during this pandemic, we are taking all necessary measures to continue providing the exceptional level of service our riders have come to expect,” said Mayor Cameron Smyth. “We have taken extra safety precautions by sectioning off every other row of seats and posted social distancing messaging throughout our fleet. Several weeks ago, we also implemented an enhanced extensive daily cleaning schedule of the entire transit fleet using hospital-grade, EPA approved disinfectant. As we continue providing a measured response to this ongoing event, the safety of our riders remains our number one priority.”

For more information on steps the city is taking to protect residents and riders, visit SantaClaritaEmergency.com. For more information on Santa Clarita Transit’s modified schedule, visit SantaClaritaTransit.com.

Resurrection Realities #3

| Opinion | April 2, 2020

Resurrection Realities #3

A 2020 Lenten series from 1 Corinthians 15

by Gary Curtis

We are continuing a four-part series about the Biblical belief in the immortality of the soul and the body–in a glorified, resurrected form. It is this unique doctrine of the resurrection that Christians reaffirm every Easter.

As I suggested last time, you might like to use a modern translation or paraphrase to review these basic premises Paul presents and which we will consider in these final two studies. Today we will study:

The Assurance of the Resurrection (1 Corinthians 15:20-28)

Having confronted questions causing doubt about the resurrection of Jesus Christ and that of believers when He comes to receive living and deceased saints at a future gathering (1 Thessalonians 4:13-18), Paul now confidently presents positive assurances concerning this future resurrection.

He began by flatly proclaiming in verse 20 that, “…now Christ is risen from the dead”! This fact and spiritual assurance are presented in the original Greek in the present tense which stressed the continuing action from a past event. Our present faith is confirmed from this supernatural past action, which has a continuing effect.

Verse 20 continues by stating that Christ “has become the firstfruits of those who have fallen asleep.” The firstfruits are the initial ripened grains of the spring harvest. It is evidence the entire harvest is on the way. Leviticus 23:4-14 speaks of the firstfruits in connection with the Passover festival where the coming harvest was consecrated. 

The New Testament teaches that Jesus actually died on the Passover and His resurrection occurred the following Sunday morning, the day following the Sabbath after the Passover (Lev.32:10ff.). This day corresponds to our Resurrection Sunday (John 19:31-20:10) and is a promise of our own future resurrection, “…those who are Christ’s at His coming” (v. 23).

In 15:22-24 Paul compares Christ with Adam, His prototype, in that what one man–Adam–did, now the resurrection from death has also become a certainty because of what one Man–Christ–did. As humans, we all are related to Adam and most will physically die as he did,  but all who are rightly related to Christ spiritually will be made to live again when He appears in the clouds and gathers up the dead and living saints to Himself (1 Thess. 4: 14-17). Only those living saints will be transformed in that instant and will be the only ones who do not die.

When our Resurrected Lord Returns

The Second Coming of Christ is not a timeless philosophical idea to be discussed and debated. Rather, it will be a distinct experience of human life and will complete the resurrection harvest (possibly at Rev. 14:14-16), for which He and His resurrection were the “firstfruits.” Now, everyone who follows Him by faith in His completed spiritual destiny can have the hope of complete acceptance and satisfaction before God as well!

Not all of God’s own will die, but we all will be changed–in a fraction of a second! 1 Thessalonians 4:16-17 assures us that at Christ’s second coming we will be raised, in our proper order. The dead who belong to Christ will be the first to rise. Then, believers who are still alive will be caught up with them in the clouds, to meet Christ our Lord in the air. 

The resurrection of Jesus Christ not only confirms our faith; it certifies our forgiveness and guarantees our future! 

We can anticipate, with confident assurance, the future day of His “coming” in a physical return to earth at the second advent (15:23-25). At Christ’s resurrection, death was defeated and at His actual “coming” back to earth to rule, it will be destroyed (cf. Rev. 20:14). Paul explained later in this chapter that death is the last enemy to be conquered in Christ’s total triumph (15:26).

This Easter season celebrates this progressive triumph of our Lord Jesus over death, hell and the grave! The tomb is empty and He is alive! 

Real Estate Recent Sales

| Community | April 1, 2020

Closed Sales Acton /Agua Dulce

Address                                  COE Date      Br    Bath Sqft Price
32740 Rancho Americana P 03/27/2020 3 3 2,824 $589,900
34468 Desert RD 03/24/2020 4 3 2,645 $652,000
10535 Escondido Canyon R 03/27/2020 5 4 3,172 $700,000
33841 Rozich RD 03/26/2020 3 3 2,032 $810,000
35023 Caprock RD 03/25/2020 4 3 3,210 $820,000
35356 Sierra Vista DR 03/27/2020 5 4 4,080 $925,000

Closed Sales Canyon Country

Address                                             COE Date Br Bath Sqft Price

18142 American Beauty DR      03/24/2020      2   2          843         $299,950

18053 Sundowner WY #62       03/25/2020      3   2          934         $310,000

27150 Hidaway AV #7            03/24/2020      2   2          1,094      $354,900

20335 Rue Crevier #522          03/24/2020      3   2          1,107      $365,000

27669 Ironstone DR #4           03/26/2020      3   3          1,268      $370,000

27014 Karns CT #61004          03/24/2020      2   3          1,386      $400,000

27945 Avalon DR                   03/27/2020      3   3          1,290      $403,000

19309 Newhouse Street           03/25/2020      4   2          1,144      $485,000

15628 Poppyseed LN              03/24/2020      3   3          1,871      $502,000

17919 Wellhaven ST               03/24/2020      3   2          1,196      $510,000

29022 Lotusgarden DR            03/25/2020      3   2          1,316      $525,000

29541 Blake WY                    03/25/2020      4   3          1,839      $537,000

19632 Soldon CT                   03/25/2020      3   2          1,464      $540,000

19613 Sunrise Summit DR       03/27/2020      4   2          1,969      $625,000

15970 Thompson Ranch DR      03/25/2020      4   4          3,047      $673,000

18780 Big Cedar DR               03/27/2020      3   3          2,408      $714,900

26526 Swan LN                     03/27/2020      5   3          2,738      $740,000

28300 Oak Spring Canyon        03/25/2020      4   2          2,850      $1,100,000

Closed Sales Valencia

Address                                       COE Date Br Bath Sqft Price

24696 Golfview DR                03/25/2020      3   3          1,217      $424,900

24507 Town Center DR #74      03/27/2020      2   2          1,090      $425,000

28560 Herrera ST                  03/27/2020      2   2          1,440      $425,000

28596 Herrera ST                  03/24/2020      2   3          1,440      $448,000

27918 Cherry Blossom PL #     03/24/2020      2   2          1,349      $460,000

27435 Cherry Creek DR           03/26/2020      3   2          1,245      $530,000

27448 Coldwater DR               03/24/2020      3   3          1,761      $545,000

23836 Brescia DR                  03/23/2020      4   3          1,960      $545,000

27069 Rio Prado DR               03/24/2020      3   3          2,032      $550,000

25704 Rancho Adobe RD          03/23/2020      3   2          1,111      $556,000

27713 Summer Grove PL         03/24/2020      3   3          1,866      $560,000

22718 Rio Gusto CT                03/27/2020      4   2          1,452      $572,000

24006 Mariposa PL                 03/26/2020      4   3          1,858      $575,000

25773 Lochmoor RD               03/25/2020      3   2          1,442      $575,000

24506 Windsor DR #B             03/27/2020      3   2          1,920      $588,000

25631 Estoril ST                    03/24/2020      3   2          1,381      $598,000

29010 Mirada Circulo              03/27/2020      4   3          2,129      $600,000

27814 Sweetwater LN             03/24/2020      4   3          1,849      $637,000

25514 Avenida Escalera           03/27/2020      5   4          2,735      $655,000

27977 Skycrest CR                 03/27/2020      4   3          1,763      $670,000

23315 Mariner LN                  03/27/2020      4   3          2,272      $686,000

24101 Willowbrooke CT           03/27/2020      4   3          2,578      $717,000

27065 Clarence CT                 03/24/2020      4   3          2,415      $765,000

28972 N West Hills DR            03/26/2020      4   4          2,502      $777,000

27013 Waterside CT                03/25/2020      4   4          3,010      $1,020,000

26039 Charing Cross RD          03/26/2020      5   5          3,648      $1,350,000

Closed Sales Stevenson Ranch

Address                                       COE Date Br Bath Sqft Price

25230 Steinbeck #E        03/23/2020         2              2              963         $370,000

25537 Burns PL                 03/25/2020         4              3              2,013     $685,000

Closed Sales Saugus

Address                                       COE Date Br Bath Sqft Price

28184 Robin AV                    03/24/2020      2   1          834         $292,500

20000 Plum Canyon RD #1      03/27/2020      1   1          733         $315,000

20000 Plum Canyon RD #1      03/25/2020      2   2          1,001      $370,000

19455 Opal LN #272              03/24/2020      2   2          1,121      $382,000

28236 Clementine DR             03/27/2020      3   3          1,764      $465,000

21738 Candela DR                 03/24/2020      3   3          1,544      $505,500

22533 Pamplico DR                03/26/2020      4   3          1,718      $565,000

22424 Barbacoa DR               03/24/2020      4   2          2,175      $615,000

28766 Park Woodland PL         03/25/2020      5   3          2,696      $685,000

22719 Coral WY                    03/27/2020      4   3          2,214      $695,000

28563 Rock Canyon DR           03/24/2020      5   3          2,737      $708,000

20301 Tamara PL                  03/27/2020      4   3          2,730      $800,000

Closed Sales Newhall

Address                                       COE Date Br Bath Sqft Price

26767 Whispering Leaves D      03/24/2020      2   2          864        $300,000

19358 Anzel CR                     03/27/2020      2   2          1,123      $365,000

18820 Vista Del Canon #D       03/23/2020      2   3          1,075      $373,000

25015 Vermont DR                03/26/2020      4   4          3,396      $840,000

Closed Sales Castaic

Address                                       COE Date Br Bath Sqft Price

31920 Marcasite LN               03/23/2020      2   2          1,020       $296,000

31932 Quartz LN                  03/23/2020      3   2          1,392       $370,000

31830 Sapphire LN                03/23/2020      3   2          1,392       $430,000

29901 Crawford PL                03/27/2020      5   3          2,772       $700,000

30430 Remington RD             03/27/2020      4   3          2,145       $870,000

 

Nursing Program Donates Personal Protection Equipment to Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital

| News | April 1, 2020

In light of the global shortage of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for healthcare professionals handling coronavirus cases, the College of the Canyons nursing program has donated this essential equipment to Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital.

“College of the Canyons has had a longstanding relationship with Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital, where so many of our nursing alumni are proud to be currently employed,” said College of the Canyons Chancellor Dr. Dianne G. Van Hook. “During this unprecedented time, we are committed to helping our local medical first responders in any way that we can. We are grateful for and applaud the efforts of all first responders who are on the frontlines of this epidemic.”

The COC nursing program donated the following items:

•240 N95 masks
•250 regular masks
•200 masks with face shields
•30 PPE gowns
•15 goggles
•300 PPE hair covers
•50 disposable stethoscopes
•800 ear thermometer probe covers
•3500 thermometer probe covers
•300 otoscope covers
•15 boxes of 100 non-sterile gloves
•17 boxes of 25-pair sterile gloves

“We are very grateful for the generous donation from the College of the Canyon’s nursing program during this challenging time,” said Jennifer Castaldo, vice president and chief nursing officer at Henry Mayo. “We are fortunate to have adequate PPE supplies, but with such an uncertain future we are gratefully accepting donations to ensure we will be able to continue to care for our patients and protect our caregivers. COC’s generosity is reflective of the generous spirit in the Santa Clarita Valley. We are honored and privileged to serve this community.”

The donation was made possible thanks to the coordinated statewide efforts of the college and John Cordova, health sector navigator and statewide director for the Health Workforce Initiative (HWI), a program of the Workforce and Economic Development division of the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, hosted at College of the Canyons.

By identifying and highlighting health care workforce needs, HWI helps California community colleges to respond effectively to changing workforce needs. HWI enables communication and collaboration between the health care sector and educational institutions.

“Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital’s clinical experts have been outstanding contributors to the professional clinical education of countless nursing and medical laboratory technician students for over two decades,” said Dr. Kathy Bakhit, Dean of Health Professions and Public Safety at the college. “College of the Canyons’ faculty, students, staff, and administrators, are all truly grateful that the college could support them directly in this way.”

Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital is accepting donations of N95 masks/respirators, surgical masks, non-latex gloves, eye protections or face shields, and hand sanitizers. Monetary donations can also be made through the hospital’s website.

Wine of the Week

| Entertainment | March 26, 2020

by Beth Heiserman, Reyes Winery

This past weekend, we bottled our latest vintages of wine. Now I’m back in isolation at home, deciding what new wine we’re going to have for dinner tonight. There are so many delicious choices.

I must say, we have a brand new rosé that I would love to share with everyone. It is our new 2017 Grenache Syrah rosé. The grapes were locally sourced from the Vineyard about 45 minutes from here. This is wine that is fermented in French oak barrels for 14 months. This is a delicate, yet vivacious wine with aromas of raspberries and flavors of freshly picked strawberries and blueberries with a hint of Mandarin.

Enjoy this with a citrus side salad for brunch, with a tomato and goat cheese quiche or with mixed berry crêpes. I also feel that a little bit of spiciness will pair just perfect. So, tonight I am making Indian food. Going shopping in my pantry is always fun. The other day we re-organized the freezer to make sure I knew what we had. As I was re-organizing I realized we had a package of naan. So that’s where my dinner plans began. Since vegetables seem to be the easiest to purchase at the market lately, I’ve decided to use a bunch of vegetables with some chicken that we froze. We are pairing this with braised eggplant, sautéed spinach and chicken biryani.

Just a reminder to everyone, the tasting room is not open for tastings until further notice. We are open for pick up only. If you prefer we can ship your wine. Please check out my shop page with all the new wines that we just bottled. https://reyes-winery.square.site/ Then click on the tab SHOP NOW!

The Cream Always Rises to the Top

| Opinion | March 26, 2020

by Paul Raggio

I’ve never worked in the dairy industry, but I’ve heard this axiom all my life; a metaphor for those leaders in critical periods of time who rise to the occasion. We have all seen this happen under many different circumstances: earthquakes, fires, hurricanes, landslides, natural and manmade disasters, and war. Often, to our surprise, those who we never thought could lead rose to the occasion, and those elected, appointed, installed leaders who we were counting on, failed. We’re living through one of those periods of time. COVID-19 can’t be seen, smelled, heard, nor touched but it sure has threatened our way of life, and were starting to see the cream in Santa Clarita Valley rise to the top in our community.

In times of crisis, we thirst for leaders who express a vision, exhibit conviction, get judgment right, and are clear, direct, purposeful, and inspirational communicators. We follow leaders who offer visions beyond today, tomorrow and next month. Visions rooted in hope, faith and charity. Hope, to those in fear, that there will be a better tomorrow after COVID-19. Faith, that together as a family, business, community, and nation we will overcome and be better for the journey we labored on. And charity, an empathetic and big-hearted response to our employees, co-workers, family, neighbors, and countrymen that we’ve got your back, we’re in this together, you won’t go without as long as I have something to give. This is the vision we thirst for!

Leaders exhibiting conviction are often described as having the requisite grit to get us through any level of hardship. Gritty leaders persevere through adversity; they’re in the game to the end; they just flat don’t give up. They commit to goals and inspire their followers to achieve them. They give confidence that no matter the hardship, we will successfully see it through to the end. Their conviction entails working strenuously through challenges, maintaining effort and interest despite failure, adversity, and plateaus in progress. They approach achievement as a marathon and their advantage is stamina. Leaders of conviction stay the course and exhibit a will to succeed!

Standout leaders in crisis express sound and reasoned judgments. Judgments are woven with personal virtues and values. Leaders know their judgments will produce outcomes, both positive and negative, impacting the achievement of the mission, goals and subordinate objectives. In arriving at judgments, leaders understand the risk of failure. In so doing, they ruthlessly hunt for facts and sniff out opinions, temper, but not ignore their guts, and actively guard against their biases before coming to judgments. They use techniques when they can to assess risk and avoid at all costs on relying solely on their guts. But when the facts can’t be ferreted out, and opinions flourish, the leaders’ guts prevail in assessing risk and arriving at sound and reasoned judgments.

The most difficult aspect of leading is communication, all types of communication; written, spoken, nonverbal, compounded by emotion, gestures, expressions, and exacerbated by ill-chosen words and misguided behaviors. Clear, direct, purposeful, and inspirational communication is a skill few people possess, and fewer leaders practice. Good ideas are lost because they are poorly communicated. Misunderstandings occur because the communicator creates confusion resulting from their lack of directness or clarity in their message. There are lots of regrets expressed by leaders who wish they could retrieve poorly communicated messages because it caused unintended outcomes. There is no level of leadership immune to poor communication. Like any other critical skill, clear, direct, purposeful, and inspirational communication, whether written, spoken, and/or nonverbal, requires considerable effort on each of our parts to get it right.

During this extraordinary time, be the cream that rises and leads, thinks, plans, and acts by expressing a vision, exhibiting conviction, getting judgment right, and clearly, directly, purposefully, and inspirationally communicating with those thirsting for your leadership. Now, let’s get after it!

Paul Raggio is co-owner, with his sister Lisa, of One True North INC Leadership and Business Coaching Solutions, a service disabled, veteran owned, family operated firm based in Santa Clarita, California, and they are certified business coaches for ActionCOACH, the number one business coaching service in the world. Paul and Lisa mentor and coach business owners and their employees on leadership and management principles in achieving and sustaining their business growth and profitability goals. Email him at paulraggio@actioncoach.com or go to his website at www.paulraggio.actioncoach.com.

Resurrection’s Realities Part 2 – The Necessity of the Resurrection

| Opinion | March 26, 2020

Last time we read verses 12-19 of 1 Corinthians 15 and learned that some in the local Corinthian congregation were either denying the resurrection of Christ or doubting whether they and other Christians would actually be resurrected also (v. 12). Apparently, this was being argued by some, without realizing the implications this had on their own faith and future.

Perhaps some had been infected with doubt by Jewish critics who had long theorized that Jesus did not really die, but that he had merely fainted or swooned on the cross and was naturally revived when placed in the cool tomb. Others said that the disciples had hallucinated or had a vision. Some thought Jesus’ spirit may have returned to encourage His disciples, but not in a resurrected body. The empty tomb was explained away by others as a giant hoax, with the body stolen by the Jews, the Romans, the disciples or maybe Joseph of Arimathea (John 19:38-42).

The best option of all for this supreme event of history is that the bodily resurrection of Jesus Christ is a fact (John 20:1-18)! He was raised from the dead, historically and bodily, by the supernatural power of God, just as the Apostle Paul relates in 1 Corinthians 15:3-11!

Challenging our Doubts
In faithfully confronting this matter in Corinth, Paul assumed the false premise that there is no resurrection and bluntly pointed out four, negative and hypothetical-“ifs” which they and we must face.

First, if there is no resurrection from the dead, then Jesus, who he called Christ (meaning the Anointed One), did not rise and everything Paul had taught them and everything they believed is “empty,” without value or truthfulness. How could they trust anything else Paul had taught?

Secondly, if there is no resurrection from the dead, then Paul and his fellow ministers are “false witnesses” about God being able to forgive our sins and raise Jesus and us from the dead to eternal life. All we have is the here and now. Personal pleasure might as well be our creed and practice.

Thirdly, if Jesus did not conquer death, hell and the grave, then Jesus’ death did not gain our salvation and “we are all still in our sins” (v.17). We and “those who have fallen asleep in Christ have perished” (v.18). If this were true, then sin killed Jesus and it will kill us and all who have believed in vain.

Fourth, and finally, if after living for God and trusting in His promises of eternal life, and there is, in fact, no resurrection from the dead, then any benefits or blessings we have received are for this life only and we are left as miserable souls, deserving of scornful pity (v. 19).

Are you a Doubter?
Before we move on, next time, to study the good news and assurances of the resurrection, we need to conquer any similarities we may have with the negative thinking of some Corinthian saints, producing critical fractures in their faith–and ours.

So, may I ask if you are a doubter? Maybe not a doubter in the resurrection of Jesus Christ, but about God’s love or His willingness to forgive you–yet again?

Or what about God’s willingness or ability to heal your body? Or to defend us from the consequences of this Wuhan COVID-19 virus? Or to change your marriage? Or improve your finances and provide your material needs?

Let me confidently remind you that our God is willing and able to meet you with truth and power, to give you victory in your circumstances. Hear these truths for discouraged and doubting exiles, needing hope and help:

“For I know the thoughts that I think toward you, says the Lord, thoughts of peace and not of evil, to give you a future and a hope…you will seek Me and find Me when you search for Me with all your heart” (Jeremiah 29:11-13)

Talk with Him, right now, about the issues of life and death with which you may be struggling. He says in verse 12, “ …call upon Me and go and pray to Me, and I will listen to you!” Receive His love, compassion and gracious touch for your point of prayer!

Join with me again next time, when we continue this Resurrection Realities series and review the assurance of the resurrection. Until then, be blessed!

It Was The Worst of Times, It Was The Best of Times

| Opinion | March 26, 2020

by Dale Paule

That was the opening line in Charles Dickens’ novel, “A Tale of Two Cities.”

It was written over a hundred years ago, but the meaning is appropriate today, because, in just a dozen words, it describes one of the most basic elements of humans. It’s that we learn who we truly are when a crisis strikes, and how we react to it which reveals that truth.

Until the recent onset of the Coronavirus, humans have had it pretty good. In fact, we’ve had it so good that we were having to search for something to complain about: something like, how someone else dressed, or something they said suddenly “offended” us. In fact, people began to invent new words and actions, then labeled them, “offensive!” Politicians gained fame and followers promoting this behavior, and before long, living a normal existence, avoiding being accused of being “racist” or “non-inclusive” was becoming impossible. Then, something occurred that pushed all that aside, and grabbed our attention: a horrifying virus, beginning in China, then, uncontrolled, spread around the world at the speed of light. Suddenly it seemed to matter less what you said or did, but whether you’d live long enough to say or do it.

It was at this point, the cloak of superiority – woven from naiveté – came off, exposing its wearer to the cold-hard fact of reality!

It surely must have seemed strange to those who’ve never known anything except receiving much, with little effort. It’s not their fault they saw things that way, of course; they simply had never experienced a life-changing experience. It’s here that an important and primary life lesson begins. It’s a lesson that always appears when we humans get too full of ourselves, and think we’re in charge of our fate. It’s not a religious concept; it’s simply having to face plain, ordinary life in its impartial form.

It’s happened many times in our existence. And so it should, because it presents the opportunity to see clearly what is important, and what is not, and to willingly make the necessary sacrifices required to overcome devastation and hardships of the many kinds imposed on us in the past. World War II is a good example.

Here are just a few things we were forced to sacrifice or use in moderation and learn to pull together so we could come through it together, alive and well.

The older among us will recall “rationing,” and how it soon became the normal way of life. Some of the things that were rationed at the time may seem of little value today, but were treasured by folks back then. Things like, butter, sugar, milk, coffee, lard and shortening, cooking oils, jams and jellies, all were allowed in only very limited quantities to each family, and required a government stamp along with the money to buy them, when, and if available. Other items like, shoes, silk, nylon, and even firewood were also on the list. Then there was the toughest restriction of all; the rationing of gasoline and tires for the family car. Oh yeah, and no new cars were made during those war years!
Imagine if the government suddenly were to begin rationing just a few of the items we use today. I can hear the screams of horror if it took a government stamp to purchase an iPhone, a computer, or a 60-inch television set!

So what happened to all those folks back then who did without all those things for those four long war years?

It brought us together, because we shouldered the sacrifice together, not alone.

We came out of it feeling pretty damned proud, and understanding that those everyday things, from the absolute “necessities” to the “toys” we allowed ourselves, weren’t the measure of our self-worth; it was our self-reliance and willingness to help others while we helped ourselves that made all the difference in how we saw and lived our lives.

And the proof was right there, every time you looked in the mirror. Don’t look now, but it’s test time again!

California Is the Most Aggressive State vs Coronavirus – WalletHub Study

| News | March 26, 2020

With states taking actions such as closing non-essential businesses, banning even small gatherings, and ordering people to shelter in place to fight the spread of the coronavirus, WalletHub today released updated rankings on the Most Aggressive States Against the Coronavirus.

To identify which states are taking the largest actions to combat coronavirus, WalletHub compared the 50 states and the District of Columbia across 46 key metrics. The data set ranges from tested cases of COVID-19 per capita to school closures, ICU beds, and shelter-in-place policies. Below, you can see highlights from WalletHub’s report, along with a summary of the largest rank changes from our previous report and a Q&A with WalletHub analysts.

Aggressiveness Against the Coronavirus in California (1=Best, 25=Avg.):
14th – State and Local Public Health Laboratories per Capita
27th – Share of Employment from Small Businesses
1st – Share of Workers with Access to Paid Sick Leave
13th – Public Healthcare Spending per Capita
5th – Epidemiology Workforce per Capita
Note: Rankings reflect data available as of 2 p.m. ET on March 23, 2020.

Q&A with WalletHub

Why is California the most aggressive state against the coronavirus?

“Some of the key reasons why California is the most aggressive state against the coronavirus include the closure of schools, bars and restaurants in the state, as well as the statewide shelter-in-place order currently in effect. California is also one of the states now requiring early prescription refills,” said WalletHub analyst Jill Gonzalez.

Why is Mississippi the least aggressive state against the coronavirus?

“The state-level measures that Mississippi has taken during the coronavirus pandemic have been relatively small. For example, the state has not closed bars or restaurants, while many other states have. Plus, Mississippi lags behind other states in COVID-19 tests administered per capita,” said WalletHub analyst Jill Gonzalez.

What are some of the most aggressive measures states have taken in response to the pandemic?

“One of the most aggressive actions that states have taken thus far is to institute mandatory stay-home and shelter-in-place orders for all residents, along with nightly curfews,” said WalletHub analyst Jill Gonzalez. “Another drastic measure has been to ban all public gatherings.”

Is the federal government doing enough for the economy?

“The government is off-base in attempting to address the economic carnage emanating from the coronavirus pandemic with the traditional tools of a recession or even a depression. Instead, the government should do whatever it takes to create a federal payment holiday for April at the least. That means all bills due for both businesses and consumers – whether it’s a mortgage payment, a rent payment, utility payment, or any other kind of bill – should be erased,” said Odysseas Papadimitriou, CEO of the finance website WalletHub. “If you combine a true payment holiday with direct relief sent to consumers to ensure the affordability of daily necessities, such as food and medicine, the situation becomes more manageable. It would also cost just a fraction as much as trying to fully replace people’s full paychecks. And, most importantly, it would not create an additional barrier to resuming normal economic life, since there would be no major bills waiting for people and businesses on the other side.”

wallethub.com

IOC Moves to Postpone 2020 Tokyo Olympics

| Sports | March 26, 2020

by Diego Marquez
The 2020 Tokyo Olympics were officially postponed on Tuesday amidst heavy backlash and concern for holding the worldwide event amidst the global pandemic and fight against the coronavirus.

The opening ceremony that was scheduled to open in Japan on July 24 will be pushed back to a date no later than summer 2021.

“(The) IOC president and the Prime Minister of Japan have concluded that the Games… must be rescheduled to a date beyond 2020, but not later than summer 2021, to safeguard the health of the athletes, everybody involved in the Olympic Games and the international community,” said the Tokyo 2020 organizing committee and the IOC in a joint statement.

The games could possibly be held in the spring of 2021.

The IOC is now in charge of pin-pointing an exact date, rescheduling venues and renegotiating television rights for the almost 10,000 athletes that will be representing their countries. The move will be costly for Japan with an estimated cost of $13 million dollars into hosting the worldwide event and will more than likely have to add to that number.

Previous Olympic Games have been canceled during wars, but this unprecedented move to put the Olympics on hold is the first time the ceremonies have been postponed due to a health scare, like the global pandemic that the world is going through.

As a result of World War I, the 1916 Berlin Olympic Games were the first Olympics to be canceled. Between the years of 1936-44, the 40’ and 44’ games were canceled due to conflicts between China and Japan and the beginning of World War II, respectively.

Hunkered Down in the SCV

| Opinion | March 26, 2020

by Harry Parmenter
A beautiful day here in the SCV. Took a nice, long bike ride, and there were more people out strolling then I’ve ever seen in my ‘hood, as I walk year-round day and night and rarely see other pedestrians. Today about half the people returned my greeting as I pedaled by on the other side of the road, social D-ing; others ignored me. The FEAR.

The Sand Canyon Country Club golf course had dozens of cars in the parking lot; folks still enjoying sunshine, fresh air and the satisfying thwack of club sending ball into orbit. Golf is an essential activity, per California lockdown regulations. The batting cage didn’t make the cut.

It’s a strange thing, this hunkering down business, especially with no clue of duration or outcome. What will be worse, the virus toll or the psychological one? Ours is not to wonder why, just deflect the rising cabin fever and avoid the rising CoV fever.

An unexpected sideshow here has been the Canyon Country Curse of the Septic Tank, which affects many homes in this tract, including ours. Heavy rain, deep intrusive roots underground wreaking havoc and $550 a pop to pump when the plumbing backs up, which can be more than once in periods of heavy rain. Thank God it’s only the two of us left here, not the six children from two prior marriages we united under this roof for years.

It’s hard to watch or read the news, which is usually bad in the best of times, but now, forget it. What’s accurate, what isn’t, who do you believe, who do you trust? Market crash, a tidal wave of pink slips, school’s out for summer in March. I had naively hoped when it became clear we were facing a national crisis that the country would pull together and unite as united states should. Foolish me; the impeachment fiasco pivoted to ex-Clinton and Warren campaign honchos forming a group to pro-actively attack every move the administration makes handling this unprecedented pandemic. Deposing the President in November clearly trumps working as one to defeat CoV19.

WWII Americans dropped everything and went to work in factories and military complexes coast to coast manufacturing munitions, ammo and ordnance to fuel the war effort that helped save the world from madmen. If today’s domestic populace faced that threat we’d lose and “me” before “we” would win.
Outside my window a crow and squirrel forage separately for food. Moments later a cat scurries furtively across the front lawn, no doubt on a similar mission. Animal instinct to survive. We must follow our own to weather this panic. Be cool. Be careful. Help others when you can. Stay connected to family and friends; moral support spreads just like a virus, but with positive mental health benefits.

This too shall pass and then we’ll have to rebuild our economy, battle a potential depression and regroup emotionally from the collective fallout. Everything will change, just like it did when this began. Hunker down in the bunker and remember, to quote Cervantes, “Where there is music there can be no evil,” so turn it UP! It’s a prescription that’s easy to fill and makes you forget the FEAR, if only for a while. Roll on…

Coronavirus Will Change How We Live

| Opinion | March 26, 2020

by Rob Werner

Many changes for individuals, families, businesses and government agencies from sheltering in place and actions to fight the virus will become permanent. Some are improvements and lifestyle changes; others compel sluggish people and institutions to utilize technology.

Kids were home alone (without friends) but this wasn’t new. The first gaming generation are adults. Kids play games from home with people around the world. Some complain the most exercise they get is with their fingers – texting. The more athletic have video exercises and dancing – performances that generate plenty of action. Expect these interactive programs to expand to include portrayal of friends.

Many older folks aren’t that different. At social functions they’re immersed in electronic devices. We had a dinner appointment. Rather than cancelling it, we had dinner together in our separate homes talking and viewing each other on Facetime. Facetime is or will be accessible on big screen smart TVs.

Many will use meal deliveries from favorite restaurants. We’ll be comfortable with virtual tours of museums and tourist destinations. We’ll take advantage of online services – ordering groceries for pickup or delivery. Banking will be done primarily online. Branches will close due to efficiency. The need for our subsidized postal service will disappear as we receive bills via email and pay online.

Churches and organizations will congregate online via virtual reality programs that give a view of the presenters and those present with their faces portrayed in the screen’s hall as if they were physically present. Attendees will be able to communicate with each other and make contributions.

More college classes will be taught online. Students will submit online questions. Physical classrooms will be shared, eliminating the need for building bonds. Online professors will teach more classes and less teachers will be needed. With pressure savings will be passed to students and tuition reduced.

For grade schools we’ll realized that home school providers, charter and choice schools were best prepared. Public schools were compelled to catchup. School choice will be advocated as the preferred primary system and when in place, school bonds will disappear.

Businesses will discover that more services can be provided from employees’ homes. Office space requirements and overhead will be reduced.

It will be recognized that government institutions often closed because they could provide a salary without providing real service. Maybe this was a union thing. But even before the virus, institutions had the means to function without ceasing performance. Courts already had court appearances via phone calls and electronic filings. Many parties will agree to have trials via video conferences. With a bit of ingenuity government services provided via the DMV, Planning Department and others will primarily be performed online.

Medical appointments will often occur without a virtual doctor visit and tests will be ordered without wasted visits.

We’ll have some new inventions such as hair coloring and barbering programs provided by something that looks like the old helmet hairdryer- or long grey stringy hair will be the fashion trend.

The U.N.’s World Health Organization (WHO) will be recognized as a political sham that damaged the fight against the virus and demands will be made to abandon or reform the U.N.

Despite the virus’s damage, Americans, being an enterprising people, welcomed innovation and made the best of their circumstances.

Bad Boys and Girls

| Police Blotter | March 26, 2020

This week, a bold 37-year-old Santa Clarita resident who was arrested for possession of a controlled substance listed his/her occupation as “drug dealer.”

A 57-year-old Castaic resident who listed his or her occupation as “disabled” was charged with corporal injury on a spouse/cohabitant, and both a 31-year-old security guard from Saugus and 32-year-old paralegal from Newhall were charged with battery against a former spouse. And an unemployed 43-year-old from Pacoima was arrested for taking a vehicle without the owners’ consent.

A 34-year-old unemployed Canyon Country resident was booked for assault likely to produce great bodily injury. And a 26-year-old waitress from Florida was arrested for battery against a former spouse.

A 47-year-old plumber from Canyon Country was arrested for robbery, as well as a 42-year-old carpenter from Canyon Country.

A 20-year-old cook from Canyon Country was charged with theft of personal property.

DUIs with prior arrests include:

38-year-old landscaper from Panorama
39-year-old salesman from Los Angeles
20-year-old restaurant worker from Saugus

Charges of possession of a controlled substance went to:

34-year-old waitress form Lompoc
35-year-old unemployed Santa Clarita resident
36-year-old plumber from Canyon Country
37-year-old retail worker from Ventura
29-year-old construction worker from Valencia
57-year-old plumber from Canyon Country
22-year-old cashier from Palmdale

A Principled Stance on Free Speech in an Age of Cancel Culture

| Opinion | March 26, 2020

by Eric Goldin

Despite all the advancements modern Western society has achieved in the fields of science, medicine, mathematics and technology, we’re in many ways still very immature. We’ve never been able to rid ourselves of the medieval mentality of silencing people who disagree with us on important issues. Our tempers go ballistic, and we get very riled up when we hear something we don’t like. We forego civilized dialogue and avoid tough conversations by any means necessary. To put it simply, we sadly choose the barbarism of muzzling others.

There will always be detrimental ideas that need to be challenged, but a good society can’t function unless people are allowed to distinguish for themselves the difference between intelligence and stupidity. Bad ideas will never cease to exist, but great ideas won’t shine in a world without free speech. Awe-inspiring discoveries can never happen if people aren’t permitted to think outside the box. We shouldn’t deny people their right to say something – even if their whole worldview is complete lunacy. We should be willing to hear them out and have thoughtful discussions with them.

There was once a time when expressing a religious or societal view that went against the grain would cost a person severely and get them a violent draconian punishment. Thankfully things are not quite that bad anymore. Nobody has to worry about being sent to the guillotine or getting burned at the stake, and we’ve improved tremendously by treating people with much more humanity and dignity, but the residue of that mindset remains with us. Throughout history, many gifted individuals got destroyed because they discovered ingenious things disproving a mainstream societal view – or were simply willing to talk about taboo subjects.

In modern times there are still so many hot button political, social, religious, and even sports topics that are so heated and make people white-hot with rage that it’s dangerous to navigate through without getting scorched with pure wrath. People are walking on eggshells because they’re so petrified of stepping out of line. Numerous prominent figures have been denied a platform to express themselves just because their opinions are “controversial.” Many folks have had their careers and reputations ruined because they said something somebody else couldn’t handle without immaturely screaming and hollering like a baby.
This cancel culture phenomenon is something that is not mutually exclusive to one side of the political aisle. Many people on each end of the spectrum have accused each other of instigating these egregious acts, but the truth is both sides are guilty of participating in it. Sadly, we live in an era where the same person who has had their free speech rights violated will then mock, laugh at, or even actively participate in the shutting down of somebody else.

One of the most profound things that any political commentator ever said was when Kyle Kulinski (host of “Secular Talk”) explained that the sign a person is principled on the issue of free speech is when they are willing to stand up for the rights of their opponents. The thing I admire the most about Kulinski is how he stays principled and will gladly rush to the defense of those who have opposite views from his own. There are always going to be many people we vehemently disagree with, but that doesn’t mean we should act like fascists and embrace the kind of behavior that limits the freedom of others simply because we have conflicting views.

Kulinski hates right-wing pundit Milo Yiannopoulos and feels his rhetoric is terrible, but in February 2017, when Milo’s event at Berkeley got called off because of a violent riot protesting his appearance, Kyle sided with Milo and spoke up for his right of free speech. Kulinski also defended Fox News host Laura Ingraham when there were cries to get her taken off the air. Kyle despises Ingraham and thinks she is a complete imbecile who gets almost everything wrong, but he didn’t believe she should be removed from her position and barred from expressing herself. He was willing to chastise the people (many of whom were fellow progressive liberals) that were trying to get her fired.

I’m not a fan of Abby Martin (host of “Empire Files”), and I believe her criticisms of Israel are invalid, but it was despicable when she was recently denied from speaking at Georgia Southern University because she supports the Boycott From, Divestment From, and Sanctions Against Israel (BDS). I completely disagree with her on this issue, and in my opinion, BDS is the wrong response to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but she shouldn’t have gotten banned from speaking because of these views.
The price of giving foolish ideas a platform is well worth it for the reward of protecting free speech and building a society where the most brilliant minds don’t get stifled.

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