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Brett Haddock Goes All-In

| Meet the Candidates | August 2, 2018

Brett Haddock knows he’s associated with the bow tie. He wears them frequently and even uses it as part of his campaign logo. Although he’s just 33, he recognizes the references to former Sen. Paul Simon (D-Ill.) and conservative commentator Tucker Carlson before he stopped wearing them.

“I was inspired by Bill Nye,” he said. “When I ran (for city council) in 2016, I wanted a way to set me apart from other candidates and show that I’m kind of unconventional, and what better way to illustrate the point than the bow tie?”
On this hot afternoon, however, Haddock eschews the bow tie for a simple gray t-shirt as he sips lemonade in a Newhall coffee shop. But he’s still a candidate for city council, having done it in 2016 “to get (his) feet wet,” and then seeking the appointment that went to Bill Miranda.

Now, Haddock hopes to take a seat currently held by Miranda, Laurene Weste or Marsha McLean.

“I didn’t think I had a chance in hell before,” he said, and the Gazette seemed to agree, grouping Haddock with three other long-shot candidates in a Sept. 1, 2016 story headlined, “The Unfamiliar Few.”

“This time, I think I have a good chance,” Haddock said. “I feel confident about it. I’ve got a message that speaks to the majority of people. I’m a working-class guy (who) understands the needs of the middle class and the changes we need to make to sustain the future.”

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In fact, he feels so confident that he quit his job as a software engineer at eBay to devote full time to his campaign.

“I’m willing to gamble until November,” he said. “It’s going to be a tight Christmas.”

In Haddock’s mind, the “needs of the middle class” means having the jobs here in the area so people don’t have to commute, and having afterschool extracurricular and vocational training for kids. While Haddock said he knows the council can’t directly make these things happen, it can take the lead and find the means, such as working with College of the Canyons and school districts.

And “the changes to sustain the future” refer to the need to recognize changing demographics in the city – younger people moving in and wanting to start families – and make housing more available. Haddock suggests more high-density housing close to mass-transit hubs.

“We need to build neighborhoods like Old Town Newhall,” he said.

Another need: reduce traffic by overhauling the city’s mass-transit system and incentivize carpools, although he didn’t specify how. Haddock said there’s a multimillion-dollar traffic center on the third floor at City Hall.

“A handful of major intersections are tied into it, where if it was staffed, it could be dynamically changed to ease some congestion,” Haddock said. “Right now, there (are) 3 separate schedules for the timer. That’s great, but when we have an accident at Valencia (Boulevard) and Bouquet (Canyon Road) that stops up traffic, we need to be able to dynamically change those lights to ease congestion without having a deputy out at the intersection to reroute traffic.

“Or those times we had an emergency in Canyon Country or Saugus and we got to get across town but we have the sheriff’s deputies blocking traffic. If we had an actual member of staff watching the intersection and make all the lights green, they could actually get across town.”

Haddock said that center is unstaffed, and he would like to see a two-person staff. “Then we have to spend a little money and upgrade the intersections in town to tie into the system so they can all be dynamically rerouted.”

Other platform positions:

He believes councilmembers should serve a maximum of four terms (16 years).

He believes in running a positive campaign, which he articulated in an open letter in The Signal in June: After the filing period closes Aug. 10, all candidates should meet for dinner (everybody pays their way) without media or staff. “We sit together and have a civil discussion; not about our candidacy or campaign, but about who we are,” he wrote. “Sharing our stories and our love for the City of Santa Clarita. My one request is that we take a candidates-only photo; just something to show that we were all able to get together and have a peaceful meal.”

Haddock declined to name who has responded. “A couple of people said they will do their best to make it,” he said.

The Gazette reported in 2016 that Haddock believed digital billboards were an issue. Now, Haddock said he stands by that acknowledges there are more important issues, such as the opioid and housing crises and seniors struggling to make ends meet, to deal with first.

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About Lee Barnathan

Lee Barnathan has been a writer and editor since 1990. His articles have been published in newspapers, magazines and online. His new book "If You Experience Death, Please Call and Other Fatal Mistakes We Make With Language," a humorous look at the ways people misuse English, is available on Amazon or at his website, www.leebarnathan.com. He is hired by people all over the country to help them refine the message or story they wish to share with their target audience or demographic.

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