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TimBen There, Done That – Boydston is Back and Boisterous as Ever

| Meet the Candidates | August 16, 2018

He’s back, and he’s angry – at the lack of roads in the city, at the hypocrisy over water, at political cowardice and with two long-serving incumbents.

TimBen Boydston is running for city council again, two years after being defeated in his bid for re-election. Last time, he ran as an independent, one who looks out for the people and isn’t afraid to be controversial.

None of that came across during the hour-long interview Tuesday. What came across was his annoyance at Laurene Weste and Marsha McLean.
He blamed them for supporting the One Valley, One Vision plan that he said has led to an increase of traffic so great that it’s starting to resemble the San Fernando Valley.

“I fought against the One Valley, One Vision plan very hard. One reason was the traffic,” he said, his vice rising for not the last time. “They voted to allow your traffic to get worse. They voted for it. You have to read the details to see that. I do not want to spend the next few years watching this place become the San Fernando Valley.”

As far as Boydston is concerned, Weste and McLean represent traffic continuing to get worse and worse. His voice rose again as he said, “If you’re sitting at a traffic light, it’s the third, fourth or fifth cycle, and you still haven’t gone through, you can thank Mayor Weste and Councilwoman McLean.”

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Boydston said when he was on the council, he asked for a traffic study that looked at peak traffic instead of average traffic, which he said the city currently uses.

“Nobody cares what traffic looks like at 2 in the morning,” he said.

The obvious solution is to build more roads, he said, and he reminded that he helped ensure construction on the Golden Valley Bridge and Via Princessa. He now wants the street to reach Wiley Canyon Road, which he says is already planned – except the council lacks “the political will to complete it.”

He knows that the Whittaker-Bermite property is a factor, but he insists roads can now be built through parts of Whittaker-Bermite “if they had the political will. They will not even address the issue because they’re not serious about building roads.”

Boydston said he’d be willing to bring up the matter as a bond issue, asking if the people would be willing to fund construction to expand Wiley Canyon, Magic Mountain Parkway and Santa Clarita Parkway that would run straight through Whittaker-Bermite.

“If the roads are not built, we will continue to have gridlock,” Boydston said.

Boydston also takes Weste and McLean to task for what he sees as hypocrisy. “In the worst drought in a hundred years, Mayor Weste and Councilmember McLean voted for new city landscaping and to water it,” he said. “Instead of setting an example, they’re telling other people to do what they can to save as much water as possible, yet they voted to put in landscaping (in the medians) and use water to water it.”

At this point, Boydston segued into what he sees as the incumbents’ political cowardice.

He was shocked that McLean, who received widespread praise for fighting to keep Elsmere Canyon from becoming a landfill just outside town in 1996, wouldn’t join Boydston and fight to keep Chiquita Canyon – also outside of town – from expanding.

And he railed against the council for passing a rule – sometimes called the “TimBen Rule” – that requires three councilmembers’ consent to place an issue on the agenda. This came about because Boydston wanted to have the city partner with the county in reducing homelessness. Instead, he said, Weste and McLean (and Bob Kellar) passed a new council rule. The council refused to even take a seat at the county’s table, and by the time Cameron Smyth finally woke up the other members and they started tackling the homeless question, Boydston said, it was two years too late to see any real county money.

“I believe being a leader on the city council, you are supposed to take a stand on an issue that affects your city,” Boydston said. Needing three people to create an agenda item “is like a Third World democracy. … In a true democracy, anyone can put something on an agenda. It’s ludicrous, but it’s the council’s cowardice.”

Boydston also touted some accomplishments, including making sure an oil pipeline contract included more liability insurance to the city, fighting to keep the Burbank-to-Palmdale high-speed train out of Santa Clarita (he said Weste voted for it and McLean favored it before changing her mind) and fighting to defeat Measure S so there would be no digital billboards in open spaces.

He also helped seniors by opposing seniors-only mobile-home conversions to all-ages parks, favored a new senior center and community center – both of which are being built – helped get rid of red-light cameras and helped bring body cameras to sheriff’s deputies.

Yet he is far from satisfied with the way the city is run and feels he can do more to help the people.

“Santa Clarita is a good place to live, and it’s not getting better, it’s getting worse,” he said. “If you ask people who’ve lived here a long time if they think Santa Clarita is a better place to live now than 10 years ago, I think most would say no.”

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About Lee Barnathan

Lee Barnathan has been a writer and editor since 1990. His articles have been published in newspapers, magazines and online. His new book "If You Experience Death, Please Call and Other Fatal Mistakes We Make With Language," a humorous look at the ways people misuse English, is available on Amazon or at his website, www.leebarnathan.com. He is hired by people all over the country to help them refine the message or story they wish to share with their target audience or demographic.

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